Further details of the known children of James Mathieson and Margaret Smith

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Further details of the known children of James Mathieson and Margaret Smith


Alexander Mathieson born 2 September 1809 in Dunbar, East Lothian.

Baptised 10 September 1809 in Dunbar, East Lothian. Nothing more known

James Mathieson born 10 December 1811 in Dalkeith, Midlothian.

Baptised 1 January 1812. A soldier with 91st. Argyllshire Regiment of Foot, James married Agnes Scott daughter of William Scott and Elizabeth Thorburn about 1840. Agnes was born in 1815 in Selkirk. James died on 17 December 1882 in Wilton Hawick. Agnes died on 1 April 1889 in Smailholm. Next generation in Mathieson Family History - See main text

Helen Mathieson born 14 January 1816 in Dalkeith, Midlothian.

Baptised 4 February 1816. Nothing more known

Euphemia Mathieson born 15 April 1818 in Dalkeith, Midlothian.

Baptised 3 May 1818.

For the census of 1841 Euphemia was living in Sandy Dean, Lasswade parish, with some other "paper Makers" a few doors down from her father's household.

1841 Census (7th. June) Lasswade (691) Folio 10 Book 10 Page 6/7

Sandy Dean, Lasswade Parish

Name

Age

Occupation

Where Born

Ann Keiller

20

Paper Maker

No

Helen Keiller

20

Paper Maker

No

Alison Keiller

15

Paper Maker

No

James Keiller

13

 

Yes

Euphemey Matheson

20

Paper Maker

Yes

For the census of 1851 Euphemia was living with her little brother and his family in Bonnyrigg, Cockpen parish.

1851 Census (31st March) Cockpen (676) Book 2 Page 19

Bonnyrigg, Cockpen Parish

Name

Relationship

Age

Occupation

Where Born

John Matthison

Head

27

Mason

Dalkeith, Midlothian

Mary Matthison

Wife

27

 

Edinburgh, Midlothian

Mary Matthison

Daughter

4

 

Cockpen, Midlothian

James Matthison

Son

2

 

Cockpen, Midlothian

Euphemia Matthison

Sister

31

 

Dalkeith, Midlothian

For the census of 1861 Euphemia was working in a mill, still living with her brother in Bonnyrigg, Cockpen parish.

1861 Census (8th April) Dalkeith (676) Book 2 Page 22

Salters Road, Bonnyrigg Village

Name

Relationship

Age

Occupation

Where Born

John Matthison

Head

36

Mason

Dalkeith, Midlothian

Mary Matthison

Wife

35

 

Dalkeith, Midlothian

Euphemia Matthison

Sister

42

Mill Worker

Dalkeith, Midlothian

James Matthison

Son

12

 

Cockpen, Midlothian

Thomas Matthison

Son

7

Scholar

Cockpen, Midlothian

Catherine Matthison

Daughter

4

Scholar

Cockpen, Midlothian

Margaret Matthison

Daughter

1

 

Cockpen, Midlothian

On 10 July 1863, in Liberton, Euphemia married Peter Inglis, a labourer, son of David Inglis, a school master, and Helen Brunton . Peter was born on 27 May 1827 in Manor, Peebles. Euphemia died on 21 April 1870 in Moorfield Cottage, Dalkeith, Midlothian. As far as can be established there were no children.

Violet Mathieson born 3 February 1820 in Dalkeith, Midlothian.

Baptised 5 March 1820.

For the census of 1841 Violet was living in Sandy Dean, Lasswade parish. She like her sister Euphemia was working as a Paper Maker, and again living a dozen or so doors down from her father in the Stenhouse "household"

1841 Census (7th. June) Lasswade (691) Folio 10 Book 10 Page 4

Sandy Dean, Lasswade Parish

Name

Age

Occupation

Where Born

Mary Stenhouse

35

Paper Maker

Yes

Catheran Stenhouse

11

 

Yes

Thomas Stenhouse

8

 

Yes

David Stenhouse

6

 

Yes

Violet Matheson

20

Paper Maker

Yes

Violet married William McCaskie, a brick maker, 20 November 1845, Dudingston, Edinburgh. William was born about 1813 in Dudingston, Portobello, Edinburgh. For the census of 1861 Violet and her husband were living at Whinnirow, Sandydean, Lasswade.

1861 Census (8th April) Lasswade (691) Book 1 Page 9

Whinnirow, Sandydean, Lasswade

Name

Relationship

Age

Occupation

Where Born

William McCaskie

Head

42

Brick maker

Dalkeith, Midlothian

Violet McCaskie

Wife

40

 

Dalkeith, Midlothian

For the census of 1881 Violet and William were living in Redrow, Bonnyrigg.

1871 Census (3rd April) Cockpen (676) Book 2 Page 23

Redrow, Bonnyrigg

Name

Relationship

Age

Occupation

Where Born

William McCaskie

Head

50

Labourer

Portobello, Edinburgh

Violet McCaskie

Wife

48

 

Dalkeith, Edinburgh

For the census of 1881 Violet and William were back in Lasswade at Eldindean.

1881 Census (4th April) Lasswade (691) Book 1 Page 9

Eldindean, Lasswade

Name

Relationship

Age

Occupation

Where Born

William McCaskie

Head

67

General Labourer

Duddingston, Midlothian

Violet McCaskie

Wife

65

 

Dalkeith, Midlothian#

For the census of 1891 Violet and William were back in Violet's home town of Dalkeith.

1891 Census (6th April) Lasswade (683) Book 14 Page 2

Moffats Close, Dalkeith

Name

Relationship

Age

Occupation

Where Born

William McCaskie

Head

77

General Labourer

Portobello, Edinburgh

Violet McCaskie

Wife

72

 

Dalkeith, Edinburgh

Violet died on 5 May 1891 in Union Poorhouse, Dalkeith. I believe that William died two years later in 1893 in Dalkeith, Midlaothian. As far as can be established there were no children.

John Mathieson born 13 February 1822 in Dalkeith, Midlothian.

Baptised 16 March 1822. I suspect John may have died in infancy as next child was baptised Jonathon.

Jonathon Mathieson was born on 2 December 1823 in Dalkeith, Midlothian.

(Note - The details following can be identified as "our" John or Jonathon due to the presence of "Euphemia sister" in the 1851 and 1861 censuses. This is of course Euphemia as listed above born 1818.)

Baptised 11 January 1824.

John (as he seems to have been known) married Mary Harlow. (Mary's surname appears as Harley in the banns read on 20 November 1846 and also she is recorded as Harley on the birth record of their children John, William, Alexander and Catherine). John and Mary had the following known children: - 

John was with his father and step-mother for 1841 census. For the census of 1851 he and his family were living in Bonnyrigg, Cockpen parish. John's elder sister Euphemia was also in the household.

1851 Census (31st March) Cockpen (676) Book 2 Page 19

Bonnyrigg, Cockpen Parish

Name

Relationship

Age

Occupation

Where Born

John Matthison

Head

27

Mason

Dalkeith, Midlothian

Mary Matthison

Wife

27

 

Edinburgh, Midlothian

Mary Matthison

Daughter

4

 

Cockpen, Midlothian

James Matthison

Son

2

 

Cockpen, Midlothian

Euphemia Matthison

Sister

31

 

Dalkeith, Midlothian

For the census of 1861 John and family were living in Salters Road, Bonnyrigg, Cockpen parish, with Euphemia still living with them. Their eldest daughter Mary was working as a Domestic servant a few doors away, in the house of Thomas Patterson, an architect and surveyor.

1861 Census (8th April) Dalkeith (676) Book 2 Page 22

Salters Road, Bonnyrigg Village

Name

Relationship

Age

Occupation

Where Born

John Matheson

Head

36

Mason

Dalkeith, Midlothian

Mary Matheson

Wife

35

 

Dalkeith, Midlothian

Euphemia Matheson

Sister

42

Mill Worker

Dalkeith, Midlothian

James Matheson

Son

12

 

Cockpen, Midlothian

Thomas Matheson

Son

7

Scholar

Cockpen, Midlothian

Catherine Matheson

Daughter

4

Scholar

Cockpen, Midlothian

Margaret Matheson

Daughter

1

 

Cockpen, Midlothian

For the census of 1871 John and family were still in Bonnyrigg in Union Street. The son listed as George, a mason, does not appear in the previous census but is the same age as Thomas who does appear in the two previous censuses but not this one! Probably one and the same individual, possibly called Thomas George Mathieson.

1871 Census (3rd April) Dalkeith (676) Book 2 Page 34

Union Street, Bonnyrigg Village

Name

Relationship

Age

Occupation

Where Born

John Matthison

Head

46

Mason

Dalkeith, Midlothian

Mary Matthison

Wife

46

 

Dalkeith, Midlothian

George Matthison

Son

17

Mason

Cockpen, Midlothian

Margaret Matthison

Daughter

11

Scholar

Cockpen, Midlothian

Alexander Matthison

Son

9

Scholar

Cockpen, Midlothian

William Matthison

Son

6

Scholar

Cockpen, Midlothian

On 10 April 1879 John and Mary along with five of their children set sail from Plymouth along with 398 like minded souls on board the 1174 ton wooden sailing ship the Nineveh, heading for a new life in Australia. Like their father George aged 24, Alexander aged 17, and William aged 14, were all recorded as "masons", with the two daughter Catherine aged 22, and Margaret aged 19, recorded as "female servants". 

Also on board was their daughter Mary and her husband James Gunn, a joiner, along with their children, Mary aged 7, Christina aged 6, James aged 2 (born in Lancashire). A fourth child an infant, George B was recorded as having died on the voyage. Whether he was born prior to their departure or during the voyage is unknown.

90 days later on 9 July 1879 in Sydney the ship and her passengers arrived in Sydney.

There is an interesting article in the Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser of Saturday 12 July 1879, detailing the arrival of the Nineveh. Some of the details do not exactly match the ships log as it looks like either the Captain or the Newspaper reporter transposed the number of single men and single women, but I do love the description of the young girls as "The single girls will be a valuable acquisition to the population. They are comely and, it is said, have many good qualities."

The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser
Saturday 12 July 1879 - page 7

IMMIGRANTS BY THE SHIP NINEVEH - The ship Nineveh, with immigrants on board, arrived in Port Jackson on Wednesday evening, and as there was no sickness on board, she was allowed to come up the harbour, and anchored off Macquarie Point. She left London with 402 emigrants, equal to 331 statute adults. They comprise 75 married couples, 59 single girls, 65 single men, 109 children between the ages of 1 and 12, and 19 infants. They seem a healthy and useful lot of persons. Their voyage has been a pleasant one, and rather uneventful, and they appear to have enjoyed it very much. The only mortality that occurred was amongst young children, of whom five died. Two births occurred, and, on the whole, the general health was good. The single girls will be a valuable acquisition to the population. They are comely and, it is said, have many good qualities. They were to have been landed this morning; but circumstances, for which the Immigration authorities do not appear responsible intervened, and they have been unneccessarily detained on board ship. Their eagerness to get on shore is naturally very keen, and it would be hardly pleasant for those responsible for their detention to go near them while their scolding humour is predominant. The other passengers will be permitted to land on Friday afternoon There are only 125 adult males on board. Eighty of them are described as ordinary or farm labourers, 12 as carpenters or joiners, 15 as bricklayers or masons, and the remainder as smiths, shipwrights, shoe-makers, tailors, or wheelwrights.

NOTE: According to the Captain's log the number of passengers embarked and landed were ;-

  • Number of Emigrants Embarked - 75 married couples, 59 single men and 68 single women, 52 boys and 57 girls between 1-12; 12 boys and 7 girls between 0-1. Total = 405
  • Number of Deaths on Voyage - 2 boys and 1 girl between 1-12 and 3 boys between 0-1.
  • Number of Births on Voyage - 3 boys and 1 girl.
  • Number of Emigrants landed - 75 married couples, 59 single men and 68 single women, 50 boys and 56 girls between 1-12; 12 boys and 8 girls between 0-1.
  • The Nineveh 1864 - 1896

     

    For the voyage of 1879 the Nineveh was captained by her master John Ross, with a crew of 41. The Nineveh was built in 1864 by Walter Hood, Aberdeen for the Aberdeen White Star Line. She was 209.9 feet long, with a 36.3 foot beam and a 22.6 foot draught. The Poop deck was 61 feet long with a  42 feet long Forecastle. This company was renowned for the smartness of their ships, with their green painted hulls, white masts and spars and gilt scroll work at their bows and sterns. The "Ninevah" was considered a lucky ship with her freights and passengers and made a great deal of money for her owners.

     

    Her Last Voyage -The Nineveh left Moodyville, British Columbia, on or about the 15th day of January 1896, bound for Sydney, Australia, with a cargo of lumber, 300 tons of ballast and a crew of 18 hands. The following day having encountered bad weather she put into Port Angeles, State of Washington. She eventually put back out to sea on 24th January but soon encountered further bad weather and by 25th she was caught in the teeth of a full hurricane. by the 26th she had suffered severe damage and the pumps were fighting a losing battle. A course was set for the nearest port but on the morning of 27th January a passing schooner, Compeer, was sighted and with opportunity of being taken off the stricken vessel the Captain had to concede defeat. He and his crew transferred to the Compeer leaving the Nineveh to her sad fate. 

    The families seem to have settled in and around Sydney New South Wales. John Matheson passed away on 12 May 1901 and was interred in Grafton Cemetery. The death index records his father's name as James and his mother's name as Margaret. His wife Mary Harlow lived on for a further six years passing away on 24 October 1907 and was laid to rest alongside her husband in Grafton cemetery. The death index records her father's name as John but gives no mother's name.

    Grafton General Cemetery

    New South Wales, Australia

     

    IN MEMORY OF

    JOHN M MATHESON

    NATIVE OF DALKEITH CO, MIDLOTHIN

    SCOTLAND

    DIED 12th MAY 1901 AGED 75 YEARS

    AND

    MARY HARLOW

    BELOVED WIFE OF THE ABOVE

    DIED 24th OCT 1907 AGED 83 YEARS

    William Thomson Mathieson born 30 March 1826 in Dalkeith, Midlothian.

    Baptised 23 April 1826. William was with his father and step-mother for 1841 census.

    In the 1851 census there is a William Mathieson, aged 24, born in Dalkeith, County of Edinburgh, listed as a Private Soldier, previously a Farm Servant, recorded in the Castletown Barracks, Isle of Man, along with a detachment of soldiers. I believe it is reasonable to assume that this is William Mathieson, the youngest son of James Mathieson and Margaret Smith.

    I was initially able to identify the Regiment for this detachment of soldiers through the Lieutenant included in the census, a Joseph Owgan, whose service record identified him as an Ensign and latterly Lieutenant in the 91st Foot, who "retired from the service by the sale of his commission on 8 July 1851". This was the regiment that his elder brother James had enlisted in on 7 April 1831. Subsequently using the British Army, Worldwide Index of 1851, (vailable of on the FindMyPast website), I was able to confirm the majority of the soldiers in the Isle of Man census also belonging to the 91st (The Argyllshire) Regiment Of Foot. It would appear that the regiment was stationed in Liverpool at the time, (01/01/1851-31/03/1851 ), awaiting deployement to Ireland. William Mathieson is included in this list with a Service Number 2648/92F 2461, along with his older brother, Private James Mathieson, Service Number 745. (James was actually recorded in the West Derby Union Barracks, Liverpool for the 1851 census.) What exactly the detachment under Lieutenant James Owgan, were doing in the Isle of Man is unknown, but it seems likely they were enroute to Ireland.

    In the January of 1852 William emabarked on board the HMS Birkenhead, an iron hulled paddle steamers under the command of Captain Robert Salmond. William was part of a detachment from the 91st, along with units from assorted other regiments, being sent to fight in the Frontier War in South Africa. Sadly he and many of his fellow soldiers were not to survive the trip. In the early hours of 26th February, near a rocky outcrop called Danger Point, some 180 km from Cape Town, the Birkenhead struck an uncharted rock. Reversing the engines to pull the ship clear made matters worse, with water pouring into the jagged hole ripped in the ships hull. It was clear that it was not going to take long for the mortally wounded ship to slip beneath the waves. There were not enough serviceable lifeboats for all the passengers, so the soldiers mustered on deck and stood in an orderly fashion, allowing the women and children to board the boats safely and escape the sinking ship.

    HMS Birkenhead

    When it became apparent that all was lost Captain Salmond shouted to the men that everyone who could swim must save themselves by jumping into the sea and make for the boats. However Lieutenant-Colonel Seton, the soldier’s commanding officer, quickly recognised that such a rush would mean that the lifeboats could be swamped and the lives of the women and children onboard would thus be endangered. He drew his sword and ordered his men to stand fast. The untried soldiers did not move even as the ship split in two and the gallant company slipped down into the waves. The Birkenhead sank only twenty-five minutes after she had struck the rocks, with only the topmast and sailcloth remaining visible above the water with about fifty men still clinging to them. Sadly amongst those lost was Private William Mathieson of the 91st, Service Number No. 2648, a month shy of his 26th birthday. (Source - List of those who persished on http://www.birkenhead.za.net/roll_of_honour.htm).

    Only 193 of the estimated 643 people on board survived, but the soldiers' chivalry gave rise to the unofficial "women and children first" protocol when abandoning ship, with the "Birkenhead drill" of Rudyard Kipling's poem coming to describe courage in face of hopeless circumstances. A number of Naval personnel were court martialled as a result of the accident but, as none of the senior naval officers of the Birkenhead survived, no-one was found to be to blameworthy. William Mathieson's C.O., Captain Edward W. C. Wright of the 91st Argyllshire Regiment told the court martial - "The order and regularity that prevailed on board, from the moment the ship struck till she totally disappeared, far exceeded anything that I had thought could be effected by the best discipline; and it is the more to be wondered at seeing that most of the soldiers were but a short time in the service. Everyone did as he was directed and there was not a murmur or cry amongst them until the ship made her final plunge – all received their orders and carried them out as if they were embarking instead of going to the bottom – I never saw any embarkation conducted with so little noise or confusion."

    The Book "A Deathles Story or The Birkenhead and Its Heroes" by A.C. Adison and W.H. Mattews, published in 1906, can be found at www.archive.org/details/deathlessstoryorOOaddiiala.

    There was a William Mathieson who married a Margaret Coutts in Penicuik on 14 February 1851 and initially I suspected that this was "my" William. However subsequent investigation has proven that it was not. This William was the son of Thomas Mathison, a labourer, and Margaret Brownlee. In the course of this research I have accumulated some information about this family and William and Margaret who moved to Northumberland just prior to the 1861 census. Should this family be of interest please get in contact using the Contact Form at the top ot the page as I would be more than happy to share what I know.!