Letters from Henry E. MacDonald (& children) in Galveston/Houston, Texas to Roderick MacDonald in Melbourne, Australia 1868-1908

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Letters from Henry E. MacDonald (& children) in Galveston/Houston, Texas to Roderick MacDonald in Melbourne, Australia 1868-1908

The following are transcripts of photocopies of original letters mainly written by Henry E. MacDonald, but including three written by his daughter and three by his son.  In all these letters cover the period 1868 - 1908. 

INDEX

Letters from Henry E Macdonald to his brother Roderick in Calcutta

Letters from Henry E Macdonald to his brother Roderick in in Melbourne, Australia

Letters from Georgina MacDonald, the daughter of Henry E. MacDonald

Letters from Louis Alexander MacDonald, the son of Henry E. MacDonald


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Galveston, Texas
Nov. 8th 1868

My Dear Roderick,
It is with much pleasure that I now take the opportunity of writing in answer to your very kind letter dated Sept 20 which I received last Sunday and was glad to hear by it that you were then well. I hope you will forgive me for my long silence towards you. I hope that you won't think that I had anything against you, indeed I had not and I must thank you twice over for your kindness to me during the past. I lost your address twice since I came but got your address again. I would have written to you in the [beginning] of the week only I was waiting to see if I would get a letter from Father, but got none. Since I came to Texas I had first rate health thank God, with the exception of a year ago last summer, the time of the Yellow Fever, which I will give you after a while. Now I am going to give you a little news about my-self and Texas.
I left Liverpool 4th Oct. 1866, aboard the ship Emma of Bath, Capt Rich Master, Bound for New Orleans. We had over 100 passengers aboard, and over two months passage. During this time 7 died, 6 children and one man, all of whom received a watery grave. For myself I stood like all the rest. We arrived off Algeirs, Louisiana, some time in December, crossed from there by train to Berwick Bay and went aboard of one of the Morgan Steamers for Galveston where we were met by Mr. Dickinson, the agent who took us out here, and same day we were aboard of the G. H. & H. R. Rd. for Harrisburgh, where we all departed in equal numbers for different parts of Texas. I was amongst a crowd bound for a place near San Filipe 20 miles from Austin the Capital of state. I stayed on the Cotton Plantation 10 days. Our foreman was one the name of Ferries belonging to Braemar Abdsh. Myself, Ferries, and one the name of Ross, belonging to the same place, left the plantation during the night. I sold nearly all my clothes to some negroes and they took [us] at night across the Prairie to a Railway on the Brazos River where we shipped for Galveston. Ross

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got killed on a train on the Richmond Road, Ferries went home, and I stayed in Galveston. When I came to Galveston I got plenty of work in the Factors Cotton press where I worked over two months. When I left there and shipped aboard one of the Trinity River Boats and stoped two months on her. I was very unfortunate on her. When we laid up for the season the next morning I and all the crew were to get paid and discharged, when, on the night before, she burned up at 11pm when all was in bed, and lost every thing I had. The Pilot was lost. I managed to get ashore while others had to swim for their life. We had to sleep two nights on the bank of the river untill another steamer was coming down (Ruthven) Capt. Gordon, (Clerk . Burns). They took us to Galveston next morning. After we came into Galveston the Ruthven wanted a crew. I shipped deck hand. At night they made me watchman. I was on her for a short time after she laid up for the season. Capt. Gordon is Scotch. His mother belonged to Forres near Inverness & was drowned in Galveston in a well. 12 months ago I got sick aboard of her up the Trinity with the Congestive Fever of the Brain. Cp. Gordon took me to Galveston and put me in the Marine Hospital. I was there over two months with the Yellow Fever that was raging here. It was an awful time. You could not go along the streets without seeing dead bodies laying on the sidewalk. After I got my discharge I went to work for Government up at the Barracks. I got [the job of] ambulance driver. The very first thing I did was to take a Soldier to the grave. After I came I was put in the stable, James Rice was Stable Master and he took an interest in me and he made me Cook. Well I was cooking for least two months during this time. I was twice in Military Hospital [and] when I came out Jim give me my work back again. Then the Flood came in Oct 4th. I thought the Island was sunk Beneath the waves After I stopped there orders was issued to discharge all Citizens and Soldiers to be put in our place.

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After I left there I worked at Cotton or anything I could get to do. Work was then scarce perhaps 12 days out,3 in. Still I had to live and pay my 1# a day for provend. The Bridge between here and Virginia Point where the Railway crosses was washed away, then it had to be finished which took nearly 3 months. Then there was a steamer in conexion with the Railroad on last Christmas. I got work at their Boat to discharge cotton 50cts. an hour. Well what I could make during the day made sufficient to pay expenses. Last April I happened to go down town to get some work, and while sitting down resting at the warve who should call me but Le Compte agent for the Railroad. He asked me if I wanted to work I said yes. So he spoke to the Supt. Same day I was sent up to Virginia point to load and unload Cars. When the Bridge was finished I came down with the rest to Galveston, and Hardy who was Agt. at V.Point give me work in the warehouse - discharged another man and put me in there. I met Le Compte, Joe Clements, Receiving Clerk, & Baily Vincent, Way Bill Clerk and all knowing me I was all right. The only thing I did not like was the wages 50# a month and find yourself. However I could not do any better so I stopped and by and by I may get advanced both in pay and station. One thing they like me for they can depend on me. What they tell me to do is done, never away from my work never drunk. Several was discharged for drunkeness &c

Well Roderick here I am in Texas. I left home to Better myself. My Father & Mother wishes me to go home [but] if I go home I believe I will [be] more a burden than anything else. However I am going to stop here to see what Fortune will turn up. I have been knocked about since I came here a great deal - well such is life.
We have had a very fine and healthy summer. We expect to have a bussy season here & there is plenty of Cotton in Texas. The Trains Brought

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over 1000 Bales as you will see in the Manifest. The Cars brings no less than 500 every day and by the amount of bagging that goes up the County there seems to be plenty of Cotton. We had last year a ship direct from Calcutta laden with E. India Bagging. Well Roderick I hope this letter when read may be answered. There is not much news but, as you will hear of before this will reach, that Gen. Grant is elected President of the A. States.
I send you three papers
              The Galveston News
               Bulliten
                and Frank Lesalis
I now must conclude with love to you Dear Roderick
ever your Affectionate Brother
Henry E. Macdonald
Ps I received your likeness. It is a great deal better than the last. You look well
Write soon be sure now
Address
Henry E. Macdonald
Care of Charles D. Green
Post Office
Galveston
Texas
USA
Charles D. Green is the place where I stay

Good By
Write soon

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Galveston, Texas
March 21st 1869

My Dear Roderick,
I now sit down to write you a few lines to let you know that I am quite well. Hoping that this will find you the same. I am longing to hear to hear from you as I received no answer to the one I wrote sometime ago. I have not received a letter from Father for over two months. I suppose letters have gone astray. I hope you are keeping in good health. I have no doubt but the warm weather is coming on there as well as here. Bussiness here is very bad. I hope things will turn out better now since the Election.

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I am still in the employ of the G H & H RR and intend to be there this summer. I hear that there is about 30,000 bales of Cotton up the country here but can't get it down owing to the wet weather. I have sent you 1 Bundle of 3 newspapers. I wonder if you got them. There is nothing new here to write. I will try my next letter to send you my "Carte de Visit". There is nothing new untill next letter then I will give you a big letter.
Dear Roderick address all letter & Newspapers -
Henry. E. Macdonald
care B. W. Le Compte Esq
Agent
G H & H R R
Galveston Texas

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Galveston, Texas
July 23rd 1871

My Dear Roderick,
It is with much pleasure that I received your welcome letter dated "Melbourne" May 29th Today - Sunday July 23rd, and was glad to hear that you were well and doing well. I am also glad to inform you that I am in very good health for the climate here. Well there is a good Reason why. I am "Climated". My Wife and Baby are in good health, so far there is no Yellow Fever here this far. I do not know how long, as it is feverish weather. I am still in the Factors Cotton Press and getting along very well. I raised my self from a labourer to the position that I hold. I have got a good name through Merchants in the City as being the next best Cotton Clerk in Galveston. I do not flatter myself but you would be surprised to see the way

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that I got on since I have been in Galveston.
I am sorry to tell you that Alick left me, and yet I am glad. It was only yesterday that I learned that he was nearly killed by the RRoad (Train). Only for the engineer he would have been the grave some time ago. You know him when he drinks he is of a different temper from what you or I is. He got into a row here with some parties, near the RR but got off all right as he was kowing to be my brother. Now for the time I have been in Galveston I have made friends who like me and would do anything to help me along and several told me about the row and even told me "only for him to be your Brother he would have killed him". However as he is gone it is all right. He was getting 4$ four Dollars a day while working in the Machine Shop, but when he was discharged he did not know anybody and the whole was he did not like to work at anything but his trade and as you say he may regrate leaving Galverston, but I

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would not say anything in letters home about him as it might create disturbance.
I have wrote my Father some time ago and expect an answer very soon. Alick did not write me since he left. My wife is well, the Baby is as happy as a big sunflower. I forgot whether I told you the name of the little one. Her name is "Emily Frances" Macdonald. It is very singular, when you wrote me last before, you wrote on the day that I was married and this was received on the 20th her birthday six month old.
Now in regard to you asking me for the "Carte de Visit". I shall have to make you a promise that I will have them taken about the 5th of August and sent to you with out delay. You may look for them 50 days from this date. I have nothing new to send you. Every thing is very dull here for two months to come. The Cotton crop is good in this state, better than wheat. Regrate - (Line Missing from Bottom of Page) the paper states

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Letters come quicker by San Fransisco than any other route. It takes over 3 months by Marseilles. You can see how long it has taken to come here. I think the letter came to Galveston last Monday. Did not receive it untill today.
Along with this letter I send you Frank Lealic Illustrated Paper, also the News. When I send you my photographs I will write you also and send you some more papers. I send you also the Galveston News.
My wife sends our respects to you. I kissed the Little One as you told me. She smiled all over. She is very like my mother.
Now Dear Roderick
I will draw to a close with the best & my wife and him,
Ever Your Affectionate
H.E. MacDonald
Address
H. E. MacDonald
P.O. Box 166
Galveston
Texas

You need not write untill you receive "the Carte de visit" Goodbye

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Galveston
Texas
Augt- 8th
1871

My Dear Roderick,
As I promised in my last letter to send you my "Carte de Visit", so I keep to my promise I enclose two, myself and Annie and the Baby. The Baby is taken very well, but myself and wife are not taken so well as might be. The sun was very hot.
I look different now than when you saw me last.
I had a letter from Father dated July 4th. They are all very well at home. John is in Glasgow and working. My Father says he is going to Moyhill, Strathdearn, to teach the Gaelic to the MacIntosh of MacIntosh, a young gentleman who is heir to the MacIntosh Estates. They were all well at home when he wrote. I will send him some help soon. I am well so far, also my wife and Baby, who look well. Times are dull around Galveston during the summer months. No Yellow fever so far.
The Cotton crop is very fine throughout the State, but dispatches from up country report the worm committing ravages on a great many plantations.
I send you two Illustrated Papers, one Galveston News which I hope you will receive.
I received your papers via Southampton last Sunday so the via California is the quickest.
I have to draw to a close as the mousquotis are biting me so that I can hardly write.
I now must draw to a close with my respect and that of Mrs MacDonald,
Ever your Affectionate
Brother
H. E. MacDonald
Be sure and write soon
Address
H. E. MacDonald
Lock Box 166
Post Office Galveston Texas

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Houston, Texas
Feb 17th 1877

My Dear Roderick,
In a long time we never had the pleasure writing to one another or hearing of one another. It may be, you may think, that it is on my side the fault lays but I have wrote to you a long time ago but did not receive an answer. I thought probably you were not there or the letter went astray. I sent a letter same time to Inverness but received no answer, so I let the matter go on from month to month untill one day I received a newspaper with the death of my Father. I thought that surely there will be a letter along with but no letter. I delayed writing because I had lost your and Fathers address by fire so I was left in the dark. but I wrote to Mr Forsyth, editor of the Inverness Advertiser who delivered it to John MacLennan. From thence it went to Glasgow where I received a letter from Alick dated Jany 1st. So Roderick there was not much fault part. Leaving all aside, I hope this will reach you. As soon as I got the address from Alick I sent papers to him, also to you. Annie is well also, the little boy whose name is Roderick for you. I named him before he was born. He is a smart little fellow and looks just like you. He is two years on the 11th of this month. Now Roderick I do not know whether this letter may reach you, so I will not write

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untill I hear from you, when I will write you a long long letter. I have wrote a long letter to Mother. I received a Weekly Mail from Alick last Thursday. Mother is well, also John, Alick & Maggy. I could write you a great deal of news but defer it untill I hear from you. How is Mrs Macdonald. It seems to me to be a dream that you are married. Let us know all about it when you write. I am in very good health, just as young as I was ten years ago, and never forgot when you and "I" paidet in the burn together, or the time when you got hold of the mouse in the bed in Islay and other little things that happened during the happy happy childhood days
I will close these few lines. Hoping that you will receive them with best wishes and a happy New Year
I remain ever as before Your Affectionate Brother
H. E. Macdonald
P.S. Remember me to Mrs Macdonald though I realy do not know her first name. Good night. Be sure and write soon if you receive these few lines .
Address
Henry E. Macdonald
Machine Shop
Care of H and T .C. RRd.
Houston
Harris County Texas

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Houston Texas
June 11th 1877

My Dear Roderick,
I have received your welcome & very welcome letter dated April 30th, in Sydney May 3rd, San Francisco June 1st, received in Houston June 8th. Also the two papers for which I return you many thanks. You said that you were both pleased and surprised, I cannot say that I am surprised because I was watching every mail, but I am pleased and twice pleased that I received your very welcome letter from you.
Well Roderick it is a long time since you and I had a really good chat and no wonder that you thought that I was no longer in the Land of the Living when your letter was returned marked "Not Found". It makes no difference anyhow. I have been in Texas all the time and here I am now.
You need not be a bit flattered by the intimation regarding your name sake for there is something curious about him and you and between you and myself. Well I will tell you the whole from myself down - I was born on 23rd April, my wife was born on the 23rd March, my little girl Emilly who is dead was born on the 23 January. Now the little fellow Roderick was norn on the 11 Feb'y - He missed 12 days of being on the 23 but in months you will find as follows : - Emilly Born 23 Jan'y
Roderick " 11 Feb'y
Annie " 23 March
Henry " 23 April
Now to crown the whole I have named the little boy Roderick before he was born, and still curious that you named your little boy after me about the same time that I named mine after you and still we were both ignorant of the whole affair. I am just like yourself Roderick I would like to send little Henry a present but I am sorry I am not able just now. I hope the will is accepted as much as the deed -- over

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Now you speak about your little family. Why man I had no idea that it was so large. Why you got ahead of me. I do wish the little ones long life and prosperity. Also yourself and Joanna for ---
If ne'er was wealth, it ne'er was wealth
That cost contentment, peace, or pleasure Gala Water
The bands and Bliss O' Mutual Love
Oh, that's the chiefest warld's Treasure
I am glad to see that you have not forgotten the incidents of the past. It is really pleasing to refer to them. I remember when you was stung by a Serpent. I believe you were over in Jura. I will not be positive and I remember very well when my foot got crushed in a churning machine not a (thrashing machine). That was in Keills, Islay. and I cannot forget it either because the foot tells its own tale. I was thinking of some other things that have sliped my memory just now. We will leave these for the next letter and will remember the "Days of Auld Lang Syne".
I would like very much to send you our portraits but cannot get them in time for this letter. Annie wanted to have Roderick's portrait taken to day but the little fellow is not very well being that he is cutting teeth. There is a great deppression in trade here just now, the cause I could not tell. There is one thing kept thing so dull was looking forward to the Party chosen to be President. If there was a Democratic Government things would be better. There was fraud every where Banks, Bussiness Houses, RailRoad failed untill the country is the poorest on the face of the earth at present.

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I received about two weeks ago a letter from home. I answered last Saturday and [gave] them all the news from you. I will now write you the news from home. I have been very sorry when I heard of Father's death. I know we were all sorry. He was a good man and a good Father to us all. Well he is at rest and Mother is following the same path and soon will be at rest with him. I am so sorry that I have not the means just now to send some help home because they need it very much but as soon as I can I will do it. The H and T. C. RR has run into debt and was 5 months behind with paying the employes and on March issued circulars that they would not pay any back time untill everything was settled. Here was a panic amongst everybody from the working man up to the merchant, not alone in Texas but in NewYork and other Northern Cities. They have made a proposition to settle up claims from one to seven according to the ammount. The floating debt ammounts to over $3,000,000. There are over $300,000 due to employes on the road. The proposition is not accepted so far. 20th of this month will tell the tale. If not accepted a Receiver will be appointed then there will hardly be any chance to to get any of it, as there are yet the 1st and 2nd mortages to be settled first. I will not lose very much, only two months, as I gave orders on the other months before circulars were issued and paid all out to Grocers , Butchers, Druggists &c., so I consider myself Lucky. When the notice came out, you could not nothing on credit. The Notes on the Company was of no account. I know of a young man that got a situation in

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Mexico was sent for he had no money to go, so he quit work but could not get his money. A friend of his took the amount coming to him 50ct on the Dollar - Now the RRoad is paying every month but not a cent on the back money. I am occupied in the RRoad as Machinist I am sorry that I was not allowed to learn the trade when my Father and Mother asked me in Islay what trade I would like learn. I even told them machinist. Well I started in and got on very well considering since I came to Houston I got a house and a lot of my own, paid it, same as if I was paying rent and a little more when I could. The house is not fine but does very well untill I can do better. Texas is the best state in the Union for everything you could think of, but like all other States is very bad now. Labouring men are only getting 1 dollar a day and pay 22 dollars for board. You can imagine what they can save, and there are hundreds of thousands all over the States just now that would be glad to get a dollar a day. I think times will get better by the new year or may be sooner. There is some talk of United States of Mexico going to war and I think it is most likely for the Mexicons has for some years past being coming into Texas stealing cattle, sheep, hogs, horses, & every thing they could lay their hands on.

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[and] murders, even whole family at one time. So the United States Government has last week issued orders to Gen Ord commanding on the Texas frontier to pursue the Mexicans even into Mexico. This Mexico does not like and may cause serious trouble. Now Roderick I will close on news on Texas. I could give you very interesting accounts as far as I traveled in Texas but suffice the short account just now. Will give you more next letter. I will now start where I left off in regard to Maggies letter.
Maggies letter is dated Glasgow April 16th. She gives the full account of Father's death, also of her effort to do the best she could which I know she did and I will as soon as possible try to help them. Johnny and Alick are out of work. She spoke a good deal of how Robert acted when he came to Inverness. I have no doubt but she wrote in her last letter the same news to you. She says that there are 4000 out of imployment and it must be hard with them. If I could I would send some now but when I have not got it how can I. She says Neil Darroch of Islay was at the house. Poor man he is quite done with Asthma. She says that all our friends in Inverness are well. Robert McLennan is spitting blood, Johnny is still selling potatoes as usual, [and] Georgina is well. She says that Neil Darroch had a look at me and Annie in the album. He was minding about "Loigin, Islay". It cheered Mother up to see him minding about Islay. They have a Man of War at Tom Finlay's house for the practice of naval reserve men. This is about the gist of her letter. They have moved to 11 Clyde Street, Partick. She wrote a good deal about the circumstances that they are in. I wrote them that I will as soon as possible send some help and to keep up their spirits. If I could borrow it now I would do it but I am in debt.

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on account of the way that I am placed with Rrd. We eat the commonest kind of food as every thing is very dear here. Clothes is about the cheapest of any article here. Roderick I hope that every thing will go right at home for a little while. Annie is most willing to send home some money. She tried several times to save as much as to send, but one thing or another happened [so] that we really could not do it. Well Roderick I do not know what else to write you now, only that Annie and Roderick is by the table while I write and the little fellow is showing me some pictures in a book. I have not being Galveston for over 2 years. They had a big overflow there. Then you will see by the paper that I sent you the account of the fire they had. There were some very large buildings burnt. There is no Yellow Fever here so far, it is a little to early for it. Farmers here raise all kind of vegetables all the year round and send to the Northern States. The Cotton crop is looking fine and will be a large crop, though the grassoppers made a great havoc amongst the vegetables as well as Cotton. They were so thick that they stopped trains on the CRRd. For hours the track was completely covered with them. I will now draw to a close. I promised you I would write you a long letter. I think this one is long enough, though I could spin it still longer. I will give you more news in my next. Myself and Annie would like very much to have your portraits. Try and send them in your next and we will try and send ours in our next. I will come to a close. Annie joins me in sending her love to Joanna and your self. Give little Henry a kiss for me. Be sure and write soon. Ever your Affectionate
Brother                       H. E. Macdonald

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Houston Texas
Nov 5th 1877

My Dear Roderick
It is with pleasure that I received your kind and welcome letter dated Sept 17th which I received on Oct 25th, also the papers for which I return many thanks. I am glad to learn that Joanna and the children are well, also yourself and hoping that this letter will find you in the same good health
As when you last wrote In return , I must say that at present we are enjoying health although Annie has been sick . She is all right again. Roderick is as happy as a big sunflower. He is getting very smart. He speaks very plain for his age. I bought him an ABC book with pictures. He can say the whole alphabet after me. When I read the morning paper at night he gets an old paper and reads also, although not what's in the paper. He is very fond of books. He is now at the table

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where I am writing and wants to know what I am writing. I tell him. He says "Uncle Roric faraway" He can't say Roderick but you have an idea how he speaks.
Times here are picking up since I wrote last. Well this is our busy season. Cotton is coming in lively, which is the great Texas staple. Immigration is also on the increase. In a few years Texas will be the greatest State in the Union. It is a large State - bigger than England Ireland Scotland and Wales put together. It has a different climate. It is a different climate in Houston. Just now you can see the orange trees loaded down with fruit., and as for vegetables, we have them all the year round.. The sugar crop will be very large , the cotton crop will not be so large as was expected on account of the worm, and the heavy rains that they had up the country destroyed the boll before it could be picked.

Texas is getting

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more civilized although murders are an every day occurrence. There is no hanging here
Hardly only when a man steals cattle or a horse. Then they take him to the first tree. That ends hlm.

Railroads and their troubles have ended. We have got what we wanted, but as soon as one leaves another takes his place but do not give him the …..As when we struck we wanted what we had a year last October, but all those who was no in the employ at that time, did not get it. I see by the papers that times there as far as wages are good. I have but one of the papers the "Illustrated" To a few in the shop who heard a great deal about Australia, among them is an Englishman named Stott who has relatives in Melbourne. He got some papers from them. It attracted some attention on account of the labour markets being in the German language. There are a great many Germans in the machine shop.

Last page ? page missing

Cold weather kills it here in Houston but by care it grows as well as it does in Galveston.I would like to send you the flower called the "Yellow Rose of Texas" Perhaps you heardthe song" The Yellow Rose of Texas beats Bells of Tennessee.. Along with the letter I send some papers. Be sure and don't forget sending the same papers you sent last.
I will now draw to a close hoping that this letter will find you and yours all enjoying good health, and with God's Blessing, I conclude with Annies, our Best wishes to Joanna , yourself and the Bairns,

I Remain Ever Your Affectionate Brother.

Henry E Macdonald

Give little Henry a big kiss for me. Be Sure to write soon. Good Bye

Ps
In closing my letter I forgot one thing, and that was this that about the time that you receive this letterit will be about Christmas time therefore Annie and I wish you and yours a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year and better times in 1878

H.E. Macdonald

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Houston, Texas
July 11th 1878

My Dear Roderick,
I wrote you a long letter that I sent to you last year, also some papers. I received from you about Jan'y or Feb papers in return but no letter. I thought it was lost. I sent afterwards about 60 days another letter to you from "Corsicanana" yet no answer. I also wrote to "Mother" adressed to "Maggy" but received no answer yet. I am here and the youngest of all, yet like a lost sheep. Would write you a great deal but I do not know whether you are in Melbourne now or not.
There are some Scotchmen

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here by the name of White & Hart who has been there, (White is Scotch) (Hart is Irish) yet all good men.
If you are in the same place yet, please write me as soon as you can.
Little Roderick is doing well he is now "3 Years & 6 Months" and he can say the Lords prayer very near by heart going to bed every night. Also the "A. B. C. D. & alphabet".
How is little Henry. Give him for me, a good kiss. Hopping he will enjoy good health and all other requisites, also the other children not forgetting Mrs. R. Macdonald.
I will conclude with Annies and my best wishes to you and yours Respectfully
Henry E. Macdonald

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Roderick I forgot to tell you about 4 years ago there died a Blacksmith by the name of Stewart. He was "an odd fellow also a Mason". He had two pieces of bark of the tree where Burns and his Highland Mary give their last larewell to one another. You know the verse

How Sweetly Bloomed the gay Green Birk
How Rich the Hawthorn Blossom
As underneath their fragrant shade
I Clasped her to My Bossom.

Off the same Hawthorn Tree Stewart cut it out with his knife and when or before he died he told me I should have one. Only last Sabbath day it has been spoken about. Now Roderick I will close because this letter may go where the last one went. When I am writting this it is

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two a clock in the morning. I just come home from work - worked "over time". Now Roderick write soon and let me know where Mother is. I would send you papers but I do not know whether you will get any or not. Anyway I will send you some next week as there is something Bbrewing between Mexico & Texas (or) U. States.

Hoping you are all well I will close untill I hear from you
Your Affectionate
Brother H. E. Macdonald
Good By write soon to
H. E. Macdonald
care H and T CRR
Houston, Harris Co
Texas America

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Houston, Texas
Aug 4th 1878

My Dear Roderick,
I received your paper dated June the 10th on Monday July 29th and was glad to get it. I thought you was dead. I sent papers July 11th to you. The Yellow Fever is very bad, as you will see by the papers that I send you now. There was only 100 sacks of coffee in the stores of Galveston last week and there are 1 Ship & 1 Bark from Rio de Janeiro quarantined out side the Galveston Bar. RailRoads are also Blocked. People next door nebours are going north. The Double Barrelled

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shot gunn is the only remidy here to keep people from infected Districts.
Little Roderick is well, also Annie. Received no letters from you since you wrote about 8 or 9 months ago. I know you must have wrote but never got an answer. Give my respects to Mrs R. Macdonald and to my name sake Henry. Roderick is playing by my side and I am telling him "I am writing to Uncle Roderick" I would write you a long letter but there is a man going to the Post office which is 1 1/2 miles from me. [With] The papers I send you two packages and hoping we will be all alive to see better times.

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Now Roderick I will conclude & give mine & Annies respects to Mrs Macdonald. Also do not forget little Henry for me. Hoping you are all well and wishing you all well.
I am Your
Affectionate
Brother
Henry E. Macdonald

(PS) The other day I met a Scotchman from Dundee. He has two peices of the bark of the Hawthorn Tree where Bobby Burns was with his Highland Mary. He told me I should have a peice. If I get it I will send it to you.
I will be waiting very anxiously to hear from you in answer to my letter of July 11th 1878 - Good by.

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I did not receive no letters from home I feel sorry it is not my fault. I wrote home but got no answer. When I get an answer from you giving the address, I will write right away to them.
Roderick write soon
be sure.

Address
H. E. Macdonald
care H & T CRRd
Houston
Harris County
Texas

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Houston, Texas
May 11th 1879

My Dear Roderick,
Received your letter dated Feb 25 also the Illustrated paper along and the Illustrated paper of March for which I thank you very much. As for you are ashamed and don't know how to excuse yourself (That do not matter much). So long Roderick that you are in the Land of the Living. I send you five (5) papers - in one you will see by the date about a little boy and I said "Remember Keils Islay". Now Roderick I will never forget the mouse you catched in the bed in Islay and remember "the lass that made the bed for me" [Bob Burns]
Roderick I will not write to you a very very long letter for certain reasons. The reasons are two. I received a letter from Maggy, that is from Mother, John, Alick & Maggy. I have wrote home long ago and never received no answer as I told you. I concluded that they did not care about writing, but Roderick I am like yourself good natured and wrote again. No answer. So I concluded that they did not wish to correspond with me. After so long a time "a man from Glasgow" came in to the H and H. T. and CRR machine shop with an overcoat asking if H. E. Macdonald worked here. He met a Dutchman and the Dutchman took him to me. He come from Glasgow

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His name is Cowen. I was surprised when he showed me an address which I could swere that was from Maggy but yet from Lizzie MacLennan. He told me Alick made money last year and John his brother is with his other sister, I forget her name. Georgiana is a good woman with all her faults,
Roderick I will write to you soon again. There are two parties who wishes to know about their friends. One is an old man that many years before you or I was born left Melbourne. He is a good freind to me. His name is Hart. He was up the Yarra Yarra River. (He will write a note along with this & see if you can find out anything about them)
The other is a Mr Stott and he has your last Australian paper today. I will speak of him in my next letter.
Now Roderick the papers that I send you now. There were some that I wanted to send you sometime ago but send now, and in giving them to publishers of daily papers and they print (Itms), (itmes) from the Houston Telegram if in the daily, or weekly news, save a copy and send to me. Reason [is that] the paper is young yet, as you will see, and it would be something good if they had their items copied in a foring paper. If it should so hapen, you can depend upon it - it will be printed in the Houston Telegram

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During the Yellow Fever, I have had it 12 years ago in Galveston but it was fearfull times in the Southern States. You could not imagine. I broke my other foot in December last and some of those who went as nurses came to see me and I could take an oath that they were not in Houston, that they were dead. Some died. I am glad Roderick that the children are all well and in good health also the "Old Lady". The word Old Lady is common in Texas. After a young lady gets married She is an Old Lady. I mean Joanna and hope that she is well and doing well with latest addition John Urquhart. Now you are getting along for a fact very well. As for me progressing I am about the same. I suppose it is on account of the "Yellow Fever" (Joke). About the Relic of Bobby Burns, I tried to get and could not get head nor tail of it. They say the children took it outside to play and lost it. I am sorry for it. Now your namesake Roderick is well and I was just asking him as he took some brambles from the bush outside the fence, (and the bramble fell on the paper as you will see below), what have you to say to little Henry. He says to tell little Henry that he would like to play with him, and to gather blackberries.
We are all well so far. I have had a hard time of it last winter but getting on all right now. Enclosed you will get a paper with the address of Mr Harts freind - {Sketch of small round head} My dear Roderick I will begin to close now and though I did not say everything I wished will do so probably about the 25 or 26 of May the present month and will write

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more next Sabbath. I am writting home and will send some papers there too. Roderick we are all well when writing and Annie told me to remember her to Joanna and the "Baby".
And now to conclude with our best wishes & love to you all
Yours Affectionate
Brother
Henry E. Macdonald
If you get all the papers I send you will get lots of American news. Let me know if you get 5 papers. Good By (HEMcD).
Be sure and write soon. Do not wait for my next letter but write right away
So long

Mr Murphy Hart
There are three brothers of them. They lived at Ballarat in the mine. The cousins are in Melbourne. Murphy lived in Swanston Street.
try and find out
they are from Kellkenny Irland
H E McDonald

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Houston, Texas
May 9th 1880

My Dear Roderick,
I have wrote to you a "Long Time Ago" and sent papers but never received no answer. I would like to hear from you, would write more but, I will not "untill I hear from you", as brothers which I am the youngest & you two years older and slept in the same "bed in Islay Keils" you should answer the letters I wrote.
I would like to send you a long letter but not knowing whether you are alive or not.
I will remain
Ever your Affectionate
Brother
H. E. Macdonald

address

H. E. Macdonald

Houston Texas USA

If you are alive answer

my last letter &

this one too

H E Mc D

( BE SURE )

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Houston, Texas
Oct 3rd 1880

My Dear Roderick,
I have received your very kind letter of July 11th and was glad to hear once more from you. It laid in the Post Office sometime before I received it. That was on account it was not addressed to H. & T. C. R. R. I am glad to learn that you and yours are all well, and I am happy to say that we are all well at present, though I have been sick for sometime with Fever. The is a great deal of Malarial Fever here. There is hardly a house that has not got Sickness. A great many dies. Doctors has got plenty to do and drug stores has as much as they can do to fill prescriptions, but the weather is getting coolier and sickness is subsiding. Malarial Fever is next to Yellow Fever

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I have not received a letter from [Glasgow?] in a long long time. They sent me a paper, (an Inverness) where Mother's death was in but no letter. Why they did not write I cannott imagine. I wrote at the or about the same time as I wrote to you (the one you did not receive) and so I did not write. If they are at the same address, that is if I knew I would write again however I will not until I hear from you.
In you letter you spoke so kindly about your namesake Roderick, Poor little fellow, he is dead and gone. I never said anything in the note I wrote you first about his death for I did not know whether you would get the letter or not. He died of Typhoid Malarial Fever on the 13th of last October aged 4 years 8 months. Poor little

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fellow he was a good boy. He was comencing at that age to write and read - but he is gone and we feel the loss. Since that time there was an addition to the family of a little girl, Georgiana , who is about 8 months old and a happy little girl she is. I send her portrait in the letter and the next time I write I will send ours. Times in Texas are very good just now. Cotton is comming in lively, only for the heavy rains which ruined Cotton to a great extent, there would be a large crop. It is estimated for Texas 1-500.000- Railroads are building in all directions. Texas is getting to be a little more civilized. In the letter I wrote you if you could find out anything of a certain Mr. Hart. Mr Hart is and friend of mine and an old

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man who was in Melbourne many years ago. The boat they were in they tied to a tree on Yarra Yarra where Melbourne now stands. I will send the address to you and if you can find anything out from them thankfull for it. I have no doubt but you had a great time at (expositions?). I expect it was a grand affair. Be sure and send me the papers. I received both papers which for many thanks. I will as soon as the Mails arrive will send some papers to you. The Mails are behind time. I do not know of anything of interest that I can write only what you will see in the papers. Happy to see you and Mrs Macdonald & the children all well and remember them all to them. I send Henry and some little pictures we are longing to see Yours & Joannas, will send mine in my next if all is well. Annie sends her kindest regards to you and Joanna. Iwill now conclude , but not forgotten the little children Joanna and Yourself

I remain
Your Affectionate Brother

Henry E Macdonald
Machine Shop
H& TCRR
Houston Texas
The name of the Harts
Matthew Hart & James Hart -They lived in Kilkarnay Island. They were cousins of the Murphys on Swanson Street somewhere around Great Bourke St. If you can find any information about any of the Harts you will oblige me. Also Mr Thomas Hart Houston Texas

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Houston, Texas
July 31st 1893

My Dear Roderick,
I really do not know how to commence this letter to you, after so long a time since we corresponded with one another, that it looks that we have forgotten one another, but it seems not so. I have wrote to you and to Glasgow long ago but did not get any answers to my letters. I did not know what was the matter. I wrote to Glasgow twice & I believe once or twice to yourself. How you all did not receive them I do not know. However I am glad to hear that you are still in the Land of the Living. About 2 months or more I received a paper at the office of the Machine Shop here & upon opening it I found Alick inquiring as to my whereabouts "Dead or Alive", givin his address inside. So I wrote to him at once, & had a letter

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from him givin your address. Since then I wrote back to him and so as I have been so long writing I would wait until I heard from him again. So I got a letter from him yesterday so I will give you the latest from Glasgow. He says the weather is the hottest in a number of years. There is no improvement in the upper reaches of the Clyde as regards trade and that the prospects for the winter are looking bad, if no orders come in soon for ships. Alick heard that Thomas Findlay is going to resing as his 50 years service is up in Caledonian Canal. He is going to reside with his married daughter in Kent, Eliza Jezzard. She is married to an Englishman.

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Glasgow Fair is in full swing. He says there are hundreds of men idle that will have no work to go to when it is over. They are making great alterations on the Clyde that with undergrounds the City is undermined in all directions. They are making two tunnels under the Clyde and Jamacia Bridge is to be taken down and a wider one put up. The temporary work is finished. He says that he did not got any word from you since April last. At the time of writing himself & Maggy were well. That is all the news from Alick.
Now for myself. As you see I am still in Houston, though I have been away in many parts of the State in 9 or 10 years. I was in San Antonio, Nacogdoches, Galveston and other small towns and now back to Houston again. I am still working for Railroads.

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I was at work for the Southern Pacific for 6 years also for the H_E & West Texas R .R.. I am now with H. and Texas C. R. R. R.. I am in very fair health, also the family considering the sickly summer. I at one time came near dying with rheumatism. I was laid up 3 months in bed it was a wonder that I got my leg straight again, though I cannott bend it. Times in Texas are very good for this time of the year but the weather is hot & dry. We had no Yellow fever in a number of years but Banks are just as bad they are breaking all of over the County, especially in the West but Houston has stood it all right so far. It do not bother me much as I have no money in them. I see by the papers that Australia had its share.

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Well Roderick, how have you and your family been getting along all these years. How is Mrs Macdonald & the children. They must be grown up big young men. Your namesake died I have only two, a little girl, 13 years, named Georgiana [and a] boy, 11 years, named Alexander Louis. They both going to school. I do not know where I am going to get any more news to write you. May be times will be better after the extra session of Congress takes plase but it has put many poor men idle as you will see by the paper. They will be stopped at Kansas so they will come down this way and they will be trouble then. They will be driven out of here & so all over Texas. There is no work going on in Galveston. Several of the Manufacturies here suspended and nothing will be done untill they see what Congress

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will do. They have reduced the forces in the Shop that I am working and all over the State. I will now draw to a close. Wishing you all well, as it leaves me at present. Be sure and write soon and may be I will have more news to write. Several of the Shop men ask me if I get any Australian papers. It is quite a treat to them to see one. Mrs Macdonald sends her regards to you all.
I now remain your
Affectionate Brother
H. E. Macdonald

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P.S.
Be sure and write soon. I put down the date when I wrote so will wait patiently.
address
H. E. Macdonald
H. and T. C. R. Rd.
Houston
Texas
USA

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Houston, Texas
Nov 12th 1893

My Dear Roderick,
It was with much pleasure that I received your kind and welcome letter dated Sept 29th, received on Oct 31st on Halloween. Though the letter came to Houston on the 31st I did not get it untill Nov 7th. For seven days it as been going the rounds in Texas. It was sent from Houston to a town 50 miles called Hampstead on the H & T C RR by mistake to the Bridge Supt Duncan Macdonald. He was at the World Fair and it staid there untill he came back. He has a brother there named Hugh. Then he sent it to the Car Inspector. I was told that there was a letter down at that place for me and after work I went down but he give it to the postman. The postman left it at the Car Workshops. When I got there the office was shut so I did not get it untill the morning of 7th. This is to show you how letters go astray. You bet I was glad when I got it. If you sent any papers I guess some body has got them. I send you

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the Galveston News. Did you get the paper I sent you along with the letter. I am glad to see by your letter that you were all well when you wrote. I am glad to say we are all well at present. I received a letter from Alick dated Glasgow Oct 17th. He states that he & Maggy were well only hard times. He is out of work. He had a few days work, that was all for some time. I will try & help them all I can if it is only little. Alick says Tom FIndly son Roderick Findly left Montreal with his wife and child for Chicago to be a cashier in Asonia Elictric Co .. Times are dull in Glasgow, although there is plenty of work on hand, yet they are not doing it. It is the same way in the United States the Railroads and all other bussiness are redirecting expenses to the very lowest. The Southern Pacific Shops here they only left men enough to do running repairs. The same in every Shop, but times look better.

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If not I do not know what men are going to do for work as the Cotton season is nearly over and it is the bussy season here. There are hundreds of men coming here from California & other Western States. They come in Squads of from 80 to 100. They take the freight trains by storm & compell the crews to carry them. There was a lot here the other day & 3000 are on the way. They went to the police station here and were fed by the City. Next day most of them went on to New Orleans. They are men of all Classes & Trades.
Now returning to your letter, there has sure enough being changes during the years gone by, but we cannot help it. We all have to go the same road sooner or latter. As for new arrivals they come and sure you have your share to provide for & hope they will grow up to be a blessing to you. In regard to myself I picked up the trade of Locomotive Machinist & stuck

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to it through thick & thin. That is where your letter went astray. If you put Machine Shops on it I would have got it. That was a very good name you give the Terrier, "Texy". I wish I could send you the "Yellow Rose of Texas", though the name is given to a yellow girl here. There is two flowers that I would like to send you they are the Cape Jasmine & the Magnolia their sweet scented flowers. Houston is called "Magnolia City". I send you a few verses well put together by a poet ranch man of Texas. The Brazos River is close to Houston. I received your portraits and I answered your letter but I received no answer. I did not know what became of you. I will have mine taken after a while and will send them to you. We have had no rain here for nearly 6 months.

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Cattle are dying for want of water. In Galveston drinking water is very scarce. They cannot get water by boring. They went down about 3000 ft. but the water is no good. In Houston well water is plenty. I got one 60ft deep. Annie wishes to be kindly remembered to you & wife and hope to hear from you soon. We also join in wishing you all a Merry Christmas & Happy New Year I will now bid you all good by with kindest regards & love to you all.
I remain your Affectionate
Brother
H. E. Macdonald
Adress
H. E, Macdonald
care Machine Shop
H and T RRd
Houston
Texas

U.S.A.

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Houston, Texas
April 22nd 1894

My Dear Roderick,
It is with much pleasure that I received your kind & long looked for letter which I received along with the photographs for which I return thanks. I was just looking at the ones you had taken in London & Calcutta & there was not much difference in them. Certainly you all look well. It is a good picture well taken. I received a letter from Alick dated Glasgow March 20th. They were all well when they wrote. He says things are getting better on the Clyde. More orders are booked for new vessels, only for the wet weather that is keeping things back. He says it has been raining continually since the New Year which prevents outsiders from getting on. He says he is getting a job now and again on repairs at the harbour. He says there are so many out of work

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& fight to get any work. Alick has very little news he says he got a letter from Robert's wife in London about the New Year. She sends very little news regarding her family. I am sorry to see of the hard times over there. I see in some of the dispatches last week about Labour troubles over there. Well it is all over. I do not know what it is coming to. Here in the United States I am afraid there is going to be trouble. There is an army of hundreds of thousands on the way to Washington to appeal to the Government for work.. Hundreds of them passed through here. They take hold of the trains by force. I am glad to see by the photographs that you are looking well, though you did not state in your letter. We are all well but Annie she has been sick but is

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getting better. The children are well and going to School. I am glad to see that Maggy, Robert & John are doing so well. I tell you it is a great thing to have a trade.
I received the Annual Report of the Presbyterian Church. I see the names of several of the family in it. We had a State Holliday yesterday. You will get all the news in paper I send you. If you sent any papers I did not receive them. I will try soon and have our photographs taken. I have but very little news to write, only the weather is getting hot & I have been down to Galveston last Summer. It is a nice City. The government are still working on deep water there. The ammount the government give this year is $600,000 - 700,000 in all. The rock is from up the country on the Central RRd.

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The Southern Pacific is going to build a big bridge across the Missippi River to cost $7,000,000, with rock used from Texas. I will now draw to a close. Hoping that this letter will find you all well & doing well. Annie joins with me in love & kind regards to Yourself, Wife & Children.
Hoping to have a letter from you soon again.
I remain Your Affectionate
Brother
Henry E. Macdonald

Be sure and write soon & put a few Australian flower seeds in the newspaper for Georgiana flower garden.
Good By to all
This is a leaf of the Magnolia Tree. Also a leaf of the flower. It is a fine flower. I wish I could send you a whole one.

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Houston, Texas
Dec 9th1894

My Dear Roderick,
It is with much pleasure that I now sit down to answer your kind letter which I received on Nov 14. I am glad to hear that you and yours are in good health which is a great blessing. We are all fairly well. Annie has been sick on and off for some time but is getting better right along. The only thing that bothers me is Rheumitism. It get in my knees and shoulders. I received a letter from Alick dated Nov 20. It is the same old story of hard times and sickness. They seem to go together. Maggy is very ill with boils in her head. I feel sorry for them. I sent

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them a little help, but I am not able to send any just now untill after the New Year as Taxes becomes Due Dec 31 and insurance in January but I will do what I can and as soon as I can. Trade is very dull there yet. He says he had a letter from you.
I never received a letter from Robert Findlay but I am writting to him today. I am also writting to Alick.
I have not but the least doubt but that it would be good for Robert to go to Canada, if possible. He would learn a great deal. If it were possible for him to go there he must come through Texas and stop over in Houston. The Southern Pacific from San Fransisco pases by the door.

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I should be very glad to see him.
The weather here is very warm and dry. We had no rain for several months untill a few days ago. There was an immense crop of Cotton raised in Texas this season, so much that the prices went down so low that it did not pay for raising it. The Cotton season will soon be over. Times here are a little better as far as the Rail-Roads are concerned for that is the main work in Houston.
There is a great deall of killing going here and elsewhere. In the paper I send you will see the account. They were shopmates of mine. There was another killing this morning at 12.30 am. I am still with the H and T C RRd. Bussiness in the Shop work are slacking

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off now. I will send those photos after a little while. I will be sure and send them. I send you a list of Officers of the different Lodges that I belong to for a number of years. They are Insurance & Fraternal Orders. Have you any there? I send the Galveston News for a change. Annie unites with me in sending her kind regards to Yourself, Wife and Family wishing you a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year. Be sure and write soon as I am keeping the dates when I write. With love to all.
Good by for Auld Lang Syne
Your Affectionate Brother
Henry E. Macdonald

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Houston, Texas
June 30th
1895

My Dear Roderick,
I received your welcome letter of March 15th. I was surprised to hear of Robert leaving you for Montreal, and that was the reason I delayed writing to you thinking that either he or Robert Findlay would write but I received no letter from either one of them. I wrote Finlay March 18th, but so far no answer. Well I hope he arrived all well and that he will like it. Montreal is not so very far from here, only about 4 or 5 days by rail and so I waited day after day so I give it up. I received a letter [from]

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Alick Dated June 4th. He has very little news to write, only about the launch of the war ship "Terrible". It was a Gala day in Glasgow. Maggie is very sick. It is too bad that she is so sick so long. Did you get the New Orleans papers that I sent you. We had a very cold winter here this year. There was 2ft snow in Houston, something that was never knowing before, and away in North Texas there was hardly any. I believe the climate is changing. The Cotton crop is short this year. We have too much rain. It has rained nearly all of June and the sun is very hot, which causes

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a great deal of sickness here and a great many deaths occur daly. It was like this during the Yellow Fever time in Galveston in 1867. Times in the Iron Trade is getting better but it does not affect us away down South, but one thing it will not do us any harm. We had the Confederate's reunion here this summer (May). They were from all over the States, but it rained the whole week and left here in disgust. Then on the 19th, the Negroes had their reunion and it rained also and still a raining. About the middle we are going, (if it don't rain), to have children's day where the boys will have goat-

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races and other games. It is a great day for the boys & girls.
We are all well so far - only Annie she is not quite well yet. I hope you are well over there and that times are getting better. Remember me kindly to Mrs Macdonald & all the children. Also Annie sends her respects to you all. Now Roderick be sure and write soon and do not wait as long as I did. I will now draw to a close.
With kind love to all
Your Affectionate
Brother
Henry E. Macdonald

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Houston, Texas
Nov 18th 1895

My Dear Roderick
I suppose you are wondering why I do not write. The reason was that was waiting to hear from Alick as a letter was due about the time I received yours. (untill received last week). His letter dated Oct 21st, wrote in pencil and in a hurry, are only a few lines. He writes that he is well. He says that he received a letter from you. Maggy was getting worse and the Doctors would not take in hand to cure her leg at home and ordered her at once to the Western Infirmary, Partick. He says that he does not know how she will come through but that she was cheery enough going. I really feel sorry for Maggy but I am sure it is better for her.

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I know from experience that a person will have more care taken and better treatment in an Infirmary than sometimes at home, especially when there is no money consideration. As you know Doctors will not take time or trouble unless the see the money there. I know it is here & I suppose it is the same everywhere. I really feel sorry for Maggy and if I could only help her I would gladly do so. I am glad to hear that you were all well when you wrote. As for myself I am laid up again with the rheumatism. I hardly can move about I think it is cold weather. My shoulders and my knees [are so stiff] that I can hardly walk but I feel all right every other way.
I am glad to hear of Roberts safe arrival. It is strange that Findly did not answer my letters. I never heard a word from him since the first time I wrote.

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and that was March 18th when I answered. I am sure it will do Robert good to go to Canada and I am glad to hear of him getting along so well. Bussiness here is very dull for this time of year. The Cotton crop being a very short one it is nearly all in and the many RailRoads built now gives each one less to do. They have all ready reduced forces here and at the end of the month more crews will be laid of last year it was away in Feby when they laid the Switch Engines off. So you see what a short crop will do.
I received the photos that you sent. I thought I wrote in my last letter may be I forgot. They are very fine photos. I never got a chance to get mine yet but I will get them sure and send them. There is a great time here just now and that is -- Horse Racing --

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and Rev. Sam Jones. I believe there are more going to hear the great preacher than to the Races. The people here do not like his preaching but they will go to hear him. There is a strange way about his way of preaching. It seems to me he uses to much slang language, though they all say he is in ernest.
Annie is keeping in about the same health as usual, sometimes well, and sometimes sick. The Doctors say that it will take some time yet. It has, they say, to wear off itself . I will now draw to a close. Wishing you well and a long and happy life
And to ll of you a Happy Christmas and a Happy New Year.
Hoping it will be more prosperous to each and all of us than the one we leave behind us.

I will now conclude with our Best Wishes to you all,
I remain your Affectionate Brother
H.G. Macdonald
Ps
sure and write soon and do not wait as long as I did .I would have wrote you sooner only for the reason given,
Ireceiv ed the papers you sent for which I return thanks. Will be glad to get some more.

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Houston Texas
Feb 24th 1896

My Dear Roderick
I received you kind letter with the papers for Alick enclosed on 19th inst and sent them away the same day. I also received a letter from Alick in the same mail and you will be surprised when I tell you that he got married at 189 Pollokshaws Road by the Rev. John Gool of Elgin U.P. Church on Tuesday 28th Jany 1896 to Rebecca McKenzie of Fort William Invernessshire. She is the same age as himself. I wish him & his bride Joy & Happiness the balance of the few more years alloted to them to live here below. Well Roderick may be it is better for him. I suppose he got lonley since Maggy died, He was off work all

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of last month owing to an accident to his hip joint but is all right again and intends to go to work tomorrow (Feby 3 - he wrote Feby 2d). There were 25 sat down to supper (wedding).
I received a letter from Roderick Findlay Chicago Jany 27th. They were all well when he wrote. He said that he was writing you at the same time. He says if he can he will come down South in the summer. I would be very glad to see him. He has but little news. He as well as all the rest wants my photo. I will get it shortly as I do not want to loose a day to go down town on account of the few kept at work, they do not want anyone to lay off. The times here are about the same. We have just now plenty of work on account of so many wrecks latley so they want the work done

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with out hiring any more help. The Planters are going to put more acreage in Cotton this year and with a good year for it will give plenty of work.
I received a letter from Robert Henry the later part of Decr. He was well and doing well when he wrote. I wrote him Jany 13th but got no answer so far, expect one every day. We had a very mild winter so far. It was not very cold but may be cold yet. As you will see by the Galveston News I am sending you along with this letter of the arriving of a ship from Calcutta. It will be something new to the Texican to see a full rigged ship come up to the warfs. They will do it if they have enough water. It will be a big advertisment for Galveston.
I am glad to see by your letter that Joanna and the

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children are well again after that spell of ilness. I sincerly wish you & yours good health. There is nothing to compare to good health. When a man has not got that he is surly poor for money cannot buy it back again. I am glad to say that myself is a little better. I sent to Michigan (State) for medicine that I believe will do me good. Annie is about the same, some days feeling good, and some bad. Georgiana is well, also Alex Louis. He goes to school regular and is learning fast.
When you can, send me an Illustrated paper as the men in the Shop would like to see some Australian scenery.
I will now conclude and Annie joins me in sending kindest regards to Joanna, Yourself & Children
Wish you a prosperous New Year
I remain Your Affectionate
Brother Henry

Be sure & write soon. I am all the time looking for a letter from you whither I get one or not.
Good By

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Houston Texas
May 17th 1896

My Dear Roderick
It is with pleasure that I received you welcome letter on 13th inst. Also the paper for which I return thanks. Your papers are all the time welcome. When you can send the Illustrated paper as I like to see Australian scenery. I am glad to hear of you all being well. I am getting much better since I have been taken the medicine that I got from Michigan. I received a letter from Alick on April 13th and they were all well when he wrote. He received the papers for signature all right and he sent it on to London and Edinburgh and says all things are all right. He would like very much for me to take a trip to Glasgow. I would

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I would too but cannot go now. He is still working Clyde bank on the warships "Terrible" & "Jupiter", also one for Japan. He is going to have his photo's taken, so we will see him at a distance.
I had ours taken on April 21st but have not got them yet, but will send them as soon as I get them. I think Annie will look bad as she has been sick so long. I had a letter from Roderick Findlay on the 1st. They were all well when he wrote. He sent me a photo of little Ella. She looks fine for a girl of 4 years, He says all were well in Montreal when he heard last. I did receive

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a letter from Montreal in a long time. I sent papers there may be their bussy. Roderick Findlay says that he thinks that it will be impossible for him to come to Texas this summer. Well may be better for all of us and we may more prepared next year if spared. The weather is very hot but no signs of Yellow Fever as it is too early yet for it to come. I do not think it will come here unless those running away from Cuba gets in over the quarinteen, which I hope not.
We had a great storm up the country as you will see by the papers I send you.

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Annie received a dispatch Friday that her father was very ill so she is gone to see him at a town 140 miles from here. It is one of the oldest towns in Texas "Nacgdoches" (Indian). Georgiana is keeping house while see is gone. Louis is a good boy and is going to school. Times are kind of dull here as it is too early to forecast the crop. Also the election takes place this year. I am glad to hear that times are getting better in Australia. I hope they will continue as you had a long time of dulness

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Have plenty of work in our shop- so it is in all the shops here but they are holding back until they see how the cotton crop turns out. There is a greater acreage planted this year than last.
I am writing Roderick Findlay along with yours and as I have but very little news, You will get the balance in the papers.
Remember me kindly to Mrs Macdonald and the children, not forgetting yourself, I will now conclude withgood wishes to all.
Your Affectionate Brother

Henry E Macdonald.

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Houston Texas Dec 28th 1897

My Dear Roderick
I received you very welcome kind letter dated Nov 20th on Dec 20th just one month. I have no idea how my letter got astray. May be it was on account of quarantine during the Yellow Fever Scare. Well we have had a time of it since I wrote you last. Every thing was at a standstill. RailRoads all shut down, no work and even, just now there are about 150 men out since that time in the Southern Pacific Shops. There was a great deal of sickness but very few deaths. New Orleans was the worst. We all had it in a mild form. There was hardly a house in Galveston or Houston which did not have a visit from it. However it knocked bussiness higher than a kite. Shops, Bussiness Houses, RailRoads were shut up. You could not travel no where. There were men stationed 5 miles from town with double barrell shotguns and would let no one in. Our Shops are shut up for another week owing to repairs. Will start up 3d of Jan. I am glad that the Southern Pacific are running for the poor people need work after been out so long. Today the weather is fine but for the last 3 weeks it was wet & muddy all the time. Bussines is not as brisk as it should be, but we have a good deal of work in the Shops here. There are some buildings going up but the most work is in street paving. I think times will pick up here after the New Year. I had a letter from Alick about a month ago. He was well then & at work. I got a paper from him the other day where the strike is still on and expect to closed down in Clydebank on 17th

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and by todays dispatches the strike is still on and no sign of yeilding. I received a letter the other day from Chicago. Rod says he received a letter from you also on the Decr 20th. He has been so very bussy that he hardly got time to write. They were all well when he wrote. I have not received any news from Montreal in a long time. I was under the impression that I told you some time ago what my Occupation was but I must forgot, However I will give you a detailed account of the different bussiness I was in since I came to Texas - in year 1866 I worked on the first street car track in Galveston or in Texas also working Rolling Cotton - in 1867 was Watchman on steamboat Ruthven, Capt Gordon, was up Trinity River 800 miles amongst the Indians - in 1867 Yellow Fever, came near dying , worked in Cotton Press - in1868 & 9 was Receiving Clerk in Cotton Press - in 1870 & 71 was receiving Clerk for G H & H RRd also in Grocery House of P. J. Willis Marx & Kempner. Since 1872 I worked my self up to be a Machinist.
Up to 1870 a stranger could work himself up but as the years grew on their sons grew older and their friends became more numerous so they filled the jobs that could be got. However I never did like the grocery trade, I am now at the trade I desired. I worked 5 years for the Southern Pacific, also for the H. E. & West RRd a short time. The most of the time for H and T C RRd. So you see I had my own little ups & downs. If I did not have friends I never would be where I am and strange to state Mr Burns the one who made me as I am was Foreman at the time and now & has been for years Master Mechanic. It is a fact that in all the RRd Shops in Mexico all over Texas & Western State & Territories I am known, I have talked to mechanics & engineers from different parts who heard of me only as Mac. & Scottie My part of the work is steam fitting, and though I say it myself, I have the best reputation as steam pipe fitting anywhere. So much, so good.

The weather is very fine today and it is a pity to stay in the house, after about three weekw of wet muddy weather. I forgot to state that I received your Christmas card, which is very nice. I also received one freom Alick but no letter. I was trying to get some nice ones here to send you but they were very common. They do not take the pride here as elsewhere in getting up. I hope that this will find you and yours enjoying good Health and that you enjoyed a Merry Christmas. Annie wishes to be remembered to you all. Georgianna & Louisis well and send their New Year Greetings to all. I will now draw to a close and wish you and Joanna & the "Numerous to mention" as you say - a Happy and Prosperous New Year

H.E. Macdonald

Be sure to write soon.

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Houston
Texas
Feby 4th 1899

My Dear Roderick,
I hope you will excuse me for waiting so long in not writing you. I received your very welcome and long looked for letter and was glad to hear that you were all well. In regard to the war we hardly knew here that there was any war going on only through the papers. I can assure you that I am glad to hear the good news that Robert has been elected a member of the Quebec Association of Architects. I hope to see him go up step by step the Ladder of Fortune. I have not heard from Montreal for a long time, I suppose they are very bussy. I received the cards and photo's. They are well taken. I received a letter from Alick dated Decr 4th. He was well when he wrote. I had also a letter from Rod Findlay, Chicago. They were also well when he wrote.

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We have had a great deal of sickness here in the shape of Grip. All of us has been down with it, but are all getting well again. Georgiana has presented her husband with a big bouncing boy. The little fellow is well & hearty but Georgiana is very sick with fever. The baby was born on Burns birthday, Jany 25th. We had gay time last night as you will see by the papers I send you, also a Program. We had two Pipers and it was quite a treat to the natives here to Lads & Lassies dance the regular Scotch dances, as well as to hear sung Scottish Songs & Story's. I had hard work in getting up the Programme, However by outside help I got along very well considering the lack of talent here. I have been kept bussy at this as well as other

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Lodge work that I am engaged in. I am Treasurer of the Essinic Order also Secretary & Collector of the Sick Benifit League. Also Collector of a new Lodge I organised here named Holand (Noland) Lodge #49 with 40 members and it keeps me bussy with the few spare hours that I have.
I met an Inverness man here, a plumber by trade, by the name of Donald Macdonald. He used to go to school with Rod Findlay. His wife maiden name was Frazier from Dingwall. They were glad to see me. Now Roderick I will draw to a close for this time. I will try and write more next time. Remember us kindly to Johanna & Children .
I remain
Your Affectionate
Brother
Henry. E. Macdonald

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Houston Texas
Jan 1st 1900

My Dear Roderick,
I know you are wondering why I do not write. Well, it is simply that I could not set my mind to write owing to so much other work in regards to lodges, but now I am at leasure, as I give up all Offices in all of them except the Caledonian. I am glad to see by your letter of Nov 21st that you were well when you wrote. I am glad to say that we are all well and we enter the New Year in good health. I received your paper all right many thanks.
I received a letter from Alick dated Decr 11th. They was all well when he wrote. He had the pleasure of a visit from Robert. He was very much taken with him. He visited Inverness & other places. I suppose Robert will have lots to tell you when he arrives. I would have liked very much to have met him, but I am glad that he went to old Scotland, and seen our old home & it will bring to his memory that grand song "Scotland Yet" -

Where the Heath

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waves wild upon her hills
and foaming frae fells
Her fountains sing o' freedom still
As they dance down the dells
and weel I lo'e the land my lads
that girdled by the sea
Then Scotland dales & Scotland vales
and Scotland hills for me
I'll drink a cup to Scotland yet
Wi' a' her Honours three
The Crown, the Sceptre & the Sword

I wish him Gods speed and that he will arrive all save to greet you all. Alick says he invited you to come to see him and that I must prepare & come too, but I am like yourself. It will be impossible for me to get there for a few years yet if I live. If we cannot do any better we can imagine that we are all there. I also had a letter from Rod Findlay about 10 days ago. He was well when he wrote. He received a letter from you.
We have very fine weather for this time of year. Our Shops were closed since Christmas eve but I had work untill Saturday morning 10 o'clock so I am home to day and take

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opportunity to write to all. I intended to send you the present invitation but forgot it. We had a nice time Halloween night and we are preparing to give a rousing time on the 25th. We are working on the Programme now. We are going to charge $1.00 per couple, and have a good time. Texas is raising a fund for the Transvaal Widows & Orphans, the British Club of Galveston is the head. They sent 250.00 on Saturday and more is going to follow. I am sending you todays Post. It is small but it is the 1st of the year. Now Roderick I will draw to a close. Hopping you had Merry Christmas and heartly wishing You and Yours, a Happy and Prosperous New Year, with best wishes from Myself & Annie
I remain Your Affectionate
Brother Henry

Attached Hallowe'en Invatation refered to in the Letter ofJan 1st 1900

"When bleak- faced Hallowe'en returns,
They get the jovial, rantin' kirns,
When Scottish folk of every station
Unite in common recreation.
Love blinks, wit slaps, and social mirth
Forgets there's care upon the earth."

********

Yoursel' an' the gudewife, or gin aiblins ye hae
nane, then yersel' an' ony lassie ye wale, are bidden
to a gatherin' o' the Caledonian Society at the
biggin' o' Mr. Tam Muat, in Brunner, on the
31st. of October, 1899.
Ye neena fash yoursels aboot bein sae unco
snod or weel-pit-an, for it's jist an off-loof gatherin
o' a nievefou of Scottish folk.
"Tae burn their nits, and pou their stocks,
And haud their Hallowe'en
Sae blythe that nicht."

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Houston Texas
Feby 11th 1901

My Dear Roderick
I know you are wondering why I do not write. Well Roderick it is not because that I did not want to, but actually I could not get my mind together to do so. I received your kind letter, also paper and Postal Card. I often commenced and laid pen and paper aside after heading it, with the promise to myself that "I will write next week sure" but next week came and so did week after week and now I see more than ever that "Procrastination is the thief of time". But under the circumstances I could not help it.
Regarding the Cyclone that visited Galveston and Harris Counties Sept 8th 1900, I was so upset being that it concerned myself a little.
So to give it as briefly as possible. On that eventful day I moved to a suburb of Houston named "Houston Heights" about 3 miles from the City. It was Saturday and a beautiful morning. The sun was shining bright and no indication of a storm that was brewing in the Gulf of Mexico. No one knew it originated there, but when evening came the rain commenced, falling lightly and had everything moved by 5pm when dark came. About 12pm or 1am on the 9th our house blowed down. Myself, Annie and Loui, together with Georgiana, baby and husband were all together. Henry Broecker, Georgie's husband nailed the doors, the wind

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blowing at the rate of over 100 miles an hour. The house quivered and in less time than I write this "word" went clean over with all aboard. The house was new as I had not quite finished it, but we had enough left to straighten up again. I am happy to say that none of us got injured. The only thing that happened was that of the Safe, turning over on to me when the house went over, the medicine bottles on the top shelf breaking and spilt into my eyes, blinding me for a few minutes.
You have no idea as to the effect of the storm. Large oak and pine trees from 2 to 3 feet in diameter by the hundreds were torn from their roots. Within 4 or 500 square feet from where I lived were 28 houses laying flat. It was the same all over Houston and the Coast country.
As to Galveston, I do not wish to write about. I sent you papers giving some account of it, but they have failed to give the full statement of it. They are still finding dead bodies. Last Friday they found the remains of a little boy underneath a house. Of course it was decomposed and was burned as hundreds of others were done. The number lost are estimated at between 8,000 and 10,000 lives. In fact it will never be known in this world, as a great many were visitors from all parts of United States & Europe.
We are at present all well, but have been under the weather with La Grippe

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for over a month, but are getting all right again.
There is plenty of work in the Shops and Texas is prosperous once more. Cotton is getting a good price and farmers are happy. Also they are putting large crops this year.
I have not received a letter from Alick for some time, but he sends papers. He thinks I ought to write him, which he has a right to think. Honestly I have neither answered Alick or Rod Findlay since the storm, but I am writing now. They were all well when they wrote.
I am almost ashamed in not answering any of your letters and I hope that you will forgive me this time. Will do my best not to happen again. I sent you last week the Post and Gall. News giving an account of the Burns Anniversary. We had a good time. Would like to have papers often, as I am the only one in the Caledonian Soceity that get Australian papers.
I will now conclude with best wishes for a prosperous and happy New Year, both to Yourself and Annie and Annie joins me in the same.
Hoping to hear from you soon.
I remain Your Affectionate Brother
H. E. Macdonald
address
Care H & T. C. Rd Machine Shop
Houston Texas

Note: - Reference the Cyclone refered to in this Letter - THE GREAT STORM
Galveston's prosperity was suddenly taken to a halt on September 8, 1900, when the deadliest natural disaster in United States history hit Galveston Island. A storm with winds over 120 miles per hour and tidal surge devastated the island and killed over 6,000 people. At the time of the 1900 storm, Galveston had a population of almost 38,000 and ranked fourth in the state. One-third of the city was completely destroyed. The bodies were weighted and buried at sea, but later washed ashore and were burned. The dead were uncovered at a rate of 70 per day for at least a month after the storm.

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Houston Texas
Feby 2nd 1903

My Dear Roderick
Your letter of Dec 1st received, also Postal Card - Macdonald "With Hands Across the Sea". I thank you kindly for it. I sent it to Dr Blair to be presented at the Caledonian Gathering last Thursday night as I was not able to be present on account of sickness at home. Georgiana has been very sick and Annie is not well herself owing to her being waiting on Georgiana night and day. Georgia is a little better today but very weak. I received a letter from Rod Findlay Dec 20th. They were all well. I received a Christmas greeting from Bro. Alick and several papers but no letters. I think he must have wrote and that the letter was burned up in a car load of mail from New York to San Francisco which passes through Houston. It was burned in the Middle States. I am sorry to hear of the drought and the suffering thereby but I hope that it will not continue very long. These things last but a little time. Probably may not see it again in your life time. Down in Texas we had no cold weather so far, comparitively speaking. We had a very light frost but no ice. It would be better if it was ice for then we would not have so much sickness.

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I see by your letter that you yourself had a great deal of sickness. I am sorry to hear it, as I have had plenty of it since I am in Texas, though for myself I cannot ????? - I can feel for you all, and glad to hear that when you wrote were getting along nicely.
I am sorry to hear the bad news from Australia. I hope it may not be of long duration.
We are still working overtime in the Shops here, though I have not worked any last month but this month my time will come. I do not want it 10 Hours is plenty for me.
Roderick inclosed I send you the address of --
Henry Stott
Fitzroy Street
Fitzroy
Melbourne
Cabanite Manufacturer

from
A. Stott #1914 Decantar Street, Houston, Texas
A. Stott is from Manchester Ingland and I have known him in H and T. C. RRd since 1873. He lost the run of him. If you can find anything about him let me know, A. Stott is a machinist though not rich is able to live.

Now Roderick will close with love to you all from
Your Affectionate Brother
Henry E. Macdonald

Be sure & send me papers with pictures of Australia and do not forget to write soon, never mind me in not writing you all the time. (I do not forget you)

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Houston Texas
May 7th 1904

My Roderick
Your very kind letter of Feby 7th received. Also the New Zealand paper, for which I return thanks. Also paper's giving account of the storm. I am sorry to learn of the severe accident that happened to you. You must have had a very narrow escape. I hope by this time your eye will be all right . It is a terrible thing to loose a eye. The other day in our Shop a man got struck in the eye with a rivet head and knocked it clean out. I am glad to hear that all of you are well when you wrote and hope that you may all continue so.
We are doing very well just now all but Georgiana. She is far from well but improving. We have very wet weather just now, too much, it all comes at once. It will ruin crops if it does not hold up soon. There was a heavy hail storm also, in some parts of Texas. Last four coaches & sleeppers on the Southern Pacific went by here with every window knocked out, like if (Jeeps??) fired into them. The Government is working in earnest trying to kill the Boll Weevel. The Weevil destroys the Cotton plant just before it opens and kills the flower. You will see an account of it in the papers I send. In last paper I sent was the flower of the Mexican Tree of which I sent some seeds in the paper before. Did you get them?
I have had no letter from Alick in a long time. I get papers very regular. I was thinking as to who Georgiana McLeod was. Was Georgiana

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the oldest. If so, I recollect her well for I and her went to gather potatoes in the feild. In regard to my name all that I know and recollect is Henry was given me from the son of a minister in Inverness. I do not know his name though I heard of it. (or maybe for the Minister) I see you had a great time at the unveilling of the statue of Bobby Burns. We had quite a treat down South in "Dixie" in Texas when the Gordon Highlanders came to see us. That day it rained nearly all day. It poured down untill the street cars could not run, but towards night it slacked up, and the cars were able to run. The House was crowded and the only vacant seats were paid for, [for] owing to the weather, those who bought the tickets could not come. They were a fine lot men dressed in full Highland Custom. It was something new to the girls and women of Houston to talk about, as they never seen so many at one time in their life. It was sure fine when the "Standard on the Braes of Mar" was sung. It was cheered so you could not hear anything. A great many people that I knew give a smiled look at me when the verse "Macdonald men etc". The whole performance was sure fine.
I am glad to hear of my nephews, how they are Marching up the Hill of Progress. I sincerely hope they will continue so and be a blessing to themselves and others.
Louis is working in the same Shop and getting allong all right. Now Roderick I will close for this time as it is getting late. With love from all to all. I remain your Affectionate Brother
Henry

Be sure and write soon - I like the New Zealand papers

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Houston Texas
Jan 30th 1905

My Dear Roderick
Your kind letter of Nov 27th received & I assure you that I was glad to hear all the good news, especially the good news of good health. We at this writing are so far doing very well. Georgianna is getting along all right. You must have had a good time when Robert arrived home. It is allways the same when one of the family is away for a long time, and especially in a foreing land. I hope he will do well in New Zealand and may enjoy many Happy and Prosperous Years, both to himself and young wife. I received a letter 3 days ago from Alick, the first in nearly a year. He also sent me views of Inverness, also the guide to "Islay". I assure you that I was glad to get them. They put me in mind of olden times.
Alick's letter is dated Jany 9th. He gives bad account of the hard times in Glasgow. He says on the Clyde hardly nothing is doing for the last 3 years. Trade has been very bad since the war stopped in Africa. He says people are starving on the streets. The people's effects are sold out for rent & taxes. He says there is a little better prospects since the year came in but will take a long time before they all get a start. He says he received a letter from you.
I hope the Mexican Plant will grow just to see what it is. We have had a very cold spell last week the coldest of the season, in fact we had ice.

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(Line missing from top of page?) - occupation was and I forget whether I ever told you so or not. Well my occupation is a Machinist. I worked myself up to that when I came to Houston in 1872 with the Houston and Texas Centrall. Of course I had freinds to help me along. My work on locomotives is what they call Steam Pipe work, that part of the work that gives steam to move the Engine. It is very particular work as there must be no leak in any of the many joints that are made. It is also very heavy work. I have a helper, MacNeill from Motherwell, Glasgow, who is only from there 1 year. We get along all right.
There is plenty of work in the Shops but the bussiness of the Road is falling off. Other Roads are laying off hands in Shops and other departments and we look for a cut down tomorrow night the last of the month.
I received a New Year card from Rod Findlay but no letter. Well it is my own fault. I did not answer his last letter but will write this week or next. It is a hard thing for me to start writting but when I do I do not mind it. Now Roderick, I beleive I give you all the news for this time. More next time. Wishing you all a Happy and Prosperous New Year
I remain Your Affectionate
Brother      Henry
Be sure and write soon send some New Zealand papers. Like to read them as well as Melbourne
Good by for this time

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Houston Heights
April 9th 1906

My Dear Roderick
I know you are wondering why I do not answer your very kind letters sooner. Ever since November I have been very sick with Fever & Rheumatisn and in January I was attacked with Hemmorage of the Stomach. My stomach has been hurting for a long time. I went to Doctors with it, took medecine but still it would hurt. I kept on at work when I could. About the middle of January while at work inside of the Engine took sick at my stomach, vomiting blood. Some of the men in Shop took me to the Infirmary. I am getting better within the last 2 weeks, but my knees are so sore I hardly am able to walk.
I am glad to see that you are all well and I hope that you will continue so. I received a letter from Glasgow wrote by A. J. Macdonald (Robert son). He writes for Alick. Alick is very sick indeed. The trouble started back in November last, developed into congestion of the Heart, Lungs & Liver with a tendency to Dropsy. He is not allowed to eat any solid food. He also hurt himself carrying some heavy timbers. He has the best of Doctors, Prof Dunn and Rebecca is giving him the very best of nursing. The doctor says that with warmer weather setting in he might make a good recovery.
Alick (nephew) happened to be in Glasgow on bussiness and Rebecca asked him to write me.

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His address is
Aleck J Macdonald
3 Bruce Grove Watford
Hertfordshire
England
I will write him in a few weeks. We had a very remarkable winter as you had summer. We had very light frost in Houston, though up the country was very cold. We need rain very bad just now. Yellow Fever is reported from New Orleans (10 miles) yesterday. You know there was an epedemic there last summer and as there was no freeze here to kill it, it may turn out very bad. I hope not for it will kill bussiness as well. Annie is moving about as usual. Georgianna is suffering with her eyes. One of the blood vessels in eye bursted. She is under treatment. Louis is keeping well. I will for the present draw to close. Hoping that you will not think hard of me for not writing you sooner.
Your Affectionate Brother
H. E. Macdonald
Remember me kindly to all and dont forget to write soon.
Address
H. E. Macdonald
# 835 Courtland Street
Houston Heights
Harris County
Texas

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Houston Heights
July 2d 1906

My Dear Roderick
It is with sorrow that I received the news first through you of the death of our dear brother Alic. A. J. Macdonald wrote the same as you, that Alic was very sick. As soon as I received his letter I wrote Alic & at the same time you & A. J. McD. I had no idea that he was so very low. I was going to write in answer to your letter, but was waiting for some news from Rebecca which never came, nor any answer from "A. J. McD." (he gave me his address). At last I received last week the news of Rebecca's death from Mrs MacLeod There is something strange about that that she should die so soon after, as I never heard of her been very sick.
Well Roderick, such is life. We never know when our turn comes next, as you say. Let us be prepared. Mrs MacLeod delayed in writing as she thought that "A. J. McD." wrote, as she said he would. I received Mrs MacLeod's letter last week but gives no cause of her, Rebecca's, death. She was much upset & especially that Mrs Gillies would find my letter. Aleck seems to be better off than I thought. Mrs MacLeod says he had when he died 147 in Savings Bank and more in Commercial Bank or in House but they say "147 is all". Alic made a will to Rebecca, no witnesses to it and no ammount stated.

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The lawer Mr Watson of St Vincent Street has the bank book & is to pay all expenses. She say's she does not see how they can get the remainder without our sanction.
Rebecca was not buried in Craigton with Alic but in Mrs Gillies lot. She got a lot of Fathers books pictures and the old clock. She had not much time to look over them, but everything of value they took care to keep out. Now Roderick it certainly did not cost for funeral expenses 147, and I do not think it is right to let strangers have the balance of the money. What say you. I hope to hear from you soon in regard to this.
I received the "Messenger" all OK. I read in the Messenger what a good time you had.
I am glad to hear of good times over there. We have very good times in Texas but we need rain. We had but two showers this year and it is very hot.
I am glad to hear that you are all enjoying good health. That is the main thing to have good health. I am much better than I have been. The vomiting of blood has stopped, but my knees hurts. Annie is middling this hot weather. No reports of Yellow Fever this year so far. Georgianna & Louis are fairly well.
I will now conclude with kindest regards to all from you Brother
Henry
Ps. Write soon & let me know what can be done with what money Aleck left if any. I am writing to Mrs MacLeod today.

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Houston Heights
Aug 27th 1906

My Dear Roderick
Your welcome letter of July 1st received. I would have answered it sooner, but I expected a letter from Glasgow which I only received last week. I am glad to hear that you are well and enjoying good health. As far as myself I am much better than I have been, but the rheumatism has a firm hold on me, and never expect to get rid of it. My legs & arms gets so cramped I hardly can walk. I hardly can hold the pen while writing. It comes & goes away when ever it feels like it, otherwise I am all right. Annie, Georgianna, Louis & the little boy are doing very well as far as health goes. Now a word about our neices letter. Mrs MacLeod letter was dated Aug 1st. I ought to have got it sooner. She says she had a kind letter from you and that she was writing you at that time, so you will get all the news from her. It is rather strange in regard to what became of the money Alick had, as he was thinking of buying a house and then a shop. Surely, she says, he must have money to do that. So you will have to do the best you can to recover it, if there is any way of getting at it. I enclose a part of her letter in regard to a book "Gaelic". She says she will take a note of all the books, as soon as she gets time. I guess she wrote you all the

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news, and Mrs MacLeod says she could not get my address only the H and T C RRd by accident. I never received an answer from our nephew, although I answered his letter.
The Yellow Fever is again in New Orleans a few cases. You say you have very cold weather. We have very hot weather. I have to sleep out doors and it is awfull hot at work on hot Engines. As I work in the Round House I have to work on Engines that just come in. They are hot and the weather is hot. Texas will make a fine Cotton crop this year. They can not get hands to pick it. I am still with the H & T C RRd but I am getting tired. If I live and hold out 9 more years I will be pensioned. Next year I will be 61, and if anything happens to me that I cannot work I will be entitled to a pension, but it is hard to tell, there will be many a thing happen between now & then.
As regards Mourning Paper it is not much of a custom here. For all the years here I have only seen a few and that from foreing countries. I will now close these few lines, hoping that You and Yours are all well. I hope you will find out the ammount that Alick left. It is yours and you ought to get it. It is no use for strangers to have it. Be sure and write soon. With kindest regards to all.
I remain Your Affectionate Brother
Henry

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Hair I do not know whose it is

she forgot to say - will

ask - writing her today

Houston Heights

# 835 Courtland St

Oct 28th 1906

My Dear Roderick,
Your very kind letter of Sept 6th, received Oct 8th, and was glad too see by it that you all were enjoying good health. I am pleased to say that we are all doing very well. As your summer is on our winter will soon be here. We have already frost but not in Houston. Houston is something similar to Melbourne, it is too near to the Gulf of Mexico. Now as to news from Glasgow I am like yourself, received no news from A. J. Macdonald and it is very strange. I received a letter from Mrs MacLeod, Glasgow, postmark Oct 2nd, Houston Heights, Oct 15th. She sent me a list of books and she said that she sent you one too. There is a good many of them and old ones too. She says that they took good care to keep everything of consequence & what was in all the boxes is known to them. She said she had a letter from Mrs Gillies asking her to call and see a copy of a will that Alick left in Savings Bank, leaving all to Rebecca and to her relatives. She was offered 3- but would not take it. She says that you ought to see the original will. She writes a good deal in regards to it but I suppose she give you all the information when she wrote you with the list of books. I received the Weekly paper you kindly sent on the 26th also the - (Line Missing from bottom of page)

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I am glad to see that you are very busy it is a good sign of good times.
We have had plenty of work all summer, but times are getting slack in Shop. There plenty of work but cannot spare the Engines. Big bussiness on the road moving Cotton & the Planters need help to pick cotton. I will send you some papers with all the news.
Now about that "Cable Message" from New York. Robert assuredly thought a good deal, when he went to the expense of cabling the news. He will get over all that after a while. I am glad to hear that Robert is doing so well. It would be strange if at last we were both to meet in America. There is no telling what may happen. Hope it is so. As for the cold climate, you can get used to it.
The weather is very fine today with a dry Norther. There is plenty of beans, turnips, okra, onions, figs and other vegetables growing in the garden but no fruit trees. The front garden Loui attends to it and he has all kinds of roses in full bloom. I bought a pair of Guinea Pigs for Georgiana's little boy. One died [and] Louis [got] another one. He has now over 2 Doz of them.
I beleive I have given you all the news that I can think and will now draw to a close They all join me in sending love to all, From your Affectionate
Brother
Henry
Write soon

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Mr. Roderick MacDonald,
Melbourne,
Australia
Houston Heights. Texas, May 10, 1907

Dear Uncle Roderick:

It has been a long time since you have heard from us and I am sure you must think very hard of father for not writing. But father has delayed writing from week to week saying that as soon as he could get his mind together he would write to you. As the weeks rolled by and "he still could not get his mind together to write", as he expressed it, it made me feel sad to think you were waiting for a letter and none came. So I decided to write myself, if it were but a few lines to let you know how we are getting on.
We received the papers you kindly sent us and they are highly appreciated I assure you. Father enjoys reading them so much. It certainly was a surprise to learn of Cousin Urquhart's marriage. Their pictures were fine, and they are certainly a handsome looking couple. We extend to them the wish that they may live to see many years of joy and happiness together.
About two months ago father was laid up with a very sore limb. He hurt it while at work and for a while the doctors thought, they would have to amputate the limb just above the knee. But mother gave him such careful attention that he recovered and in six weeks was able to go back to work again. He is suffering very much now with one of his knees from rheumatism. Mother is not in the best of health, complaining all the time.
I am enjoying better health now than I have in years. My little boy, George, is a fine big fellow of eight years. He also enjoys the best of health and is as bright as he can be. He began school last September and

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made a grade by January, and now his teacher tells me this morning that she thinks he will make another one by June. Father thinks there is no one like him. Being the only child in the family, it is a wonder that he is not a spoilt child, but taking every thing into consideration, he is very good.
I received a letter from Cousin Margaret about six weeks ago, and at that time she was well. She mentioned in her letter that perhaps in the near future you may live near us. We rejoice to hear of it. We certainly would be glad to know that in the future you will be nearer us than you are now.
Father mailed you a paper the other day, and hope you will receive it about the same time you receive this letter.
Will now conclude for this time. Let us hear from you soon. All join in sending love and wishing to be remembered.
Trusting to hear from you soon, I am,
Your affectionate niece,
Georgiannna Broecker
835 Courtland St.,
Houston Heights,
Texas

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Houston Heights Texas
May 20 1907

Dear Uncle Rod,
Tis' with pleasure I write for it has been months since I wrote. We are all doing well at present all well and all working. Having fine weather and fine times. This is our prosperous year being as this is going to be one of the seven years of plenty as recorded in the Bible. We have lots of strikes among our Labor Unions all over the country. My Union went out on a Grand strike on the 1st of April 1907 for more money. $3.00 a day for 8 hrs work to $4 a day 8hrs and a half holiday Saturday afternoon without pay, making Journeyman Carpenters receive $22 a week. The more skilled mechanics will recieve $4.25 + $4.50 being voulntarly given by the Contractors. I was one of the leading men during the strike of about eight days and was congratulated from all of the 500 striking carpenters. We finally won out and have enough work ahead for the next two years

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I tell you Uncle this 1/2 holiday Saturday is a Gods gift to the Laboring class of men.
The Union Carpenters, Plumbers, Brick Masons, Electricians and painters all quit Saturday at 12 o'clock sharp. The Scabs (I hate that word worse than a viper) of course work 10 & 11 hours every day in the week. I am strickly for organized Labor providing it is run in a respectable & gentlemanly and lawful Way.
Sister has completed her trade as a Stenographer & Type Writter and is working steady. Father is doing well. We have a lot 56 X 132 ft planted in vegetables from which we get a very suitable living, also food for the cow. I quit railroad work because it was too hard, steady, dirty and some what on the order of being a slave & went carpentering,, got a book on steel square & building, studied them at nights & Sunday. Worked myself up from $2.25 - 9 hours a day to $4.00 a day and eight hours. I am

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above the average carpenter of today and still learning.
Thats a Scotchman's way of doing - Work & Learn while the other fellow slumbers away.
I also have a good opportunity to pick up bargains in Real Estate. Bought 6 lots close to our home, a south east corner with 20 beautiful shade trees for a trifle over $500.00 about eight months ago. Am offered $1150.00 for same piece of property today. Thats what ready cash does and savings also.
I am getting ready to have a beautiful home of my own, to be far better than the one father now owns because I want to marry when I am 25. Will be 24 on 14 of November 1907. I read of my Cousins marriage in the paper sent to pa. Twas a fine writting or otherwise got up and certainly will be a honour to the Macdonald name. I certainly will keep it to remember him by.
It's no use for me to wish him any good luck because a Scotchman always gets ahead. For instance [you] will recall

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to your mind when father left the home of your mother and landed in Galveston, Texas on a Sunday morning with 3 cents in his pocket. He bought a loaf of bread with it and hunted all day for a job and finally caught one and since worked himself up to the present date. He being one of the best skilled machinists in the whole state of Texas.
The railroad companies take his word that the locomotives is all right and if such is not the case, why these engines runing at the rate of 65 miles every sixty minutes, if not OK, the human bodies would be laid low. Now Uncle this is not boosting father up a bit, but it is the natural truth. He is known to have the best constitution then any other man that has been with the H. & T. C. RR. these 34 years 15 of this month. Thats a Scotchman. You know yourself that a puny & sick Scotchman is seldom seen.

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I am a member of the Baptist Church, pray every night and am not ashamed of it! You will kindly excuse wording & writing of the letter as I want to put as much as possible in as many words.
I'm wondering if you will ever all move to Canada or to this great United States. You know I'm longing to see my dear father's kin people especially my Scotch girl cousins of far away Australia. Soon as my mother dies and goes beyond the veil I will take a trip to Australia and other points, that is if you do not move. When I say I [am] longing to see father's kin people, it puts into my mind my favorite song that I play & sing on the piano entitled - Longing For You in ?4p key? Jack Drislane & Theodore Morse.
Here is some of my favorite songs -
Longing for you : When the Bees are in the hive
In the Mansion of Aching hearts
I'm wearing my heart away for you

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When the Whippowill sings Maugrette
I'm trying so hard to forget you - and about 50 others
The ship channel which when through will make Houston another Liverpool, England.
I read in paper received from Scotland about the Thaw murder case in New York. Seems to be a very interesting case. The United States is noted for famous murder cases & feuds. The Kentucky feud started years ago from one small boy jesting his play mate about the patches in the seat of his pants. Fathers, brothers, sons, and their families on both sides took up the fight and it is not ended yet. Somewhere about 103 or 104 people killed or hung, all from a quarrel.
Now kind Uncle I will close for the present. Wishing to hear of your good health and prosperity. I remain
Fraternally Your
Loving Unseen American nephew
Louis Alex Macdonald
835 Cortlandt St Houston Heights Texas

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APR 13 1908

To My Christian Uncle,
Tis after many days I again pen you a few lines to let you know that we are all in good health and all working. Father had me to send you some postal cards which he picked out for you. You do not seem to really know how much he loves you for he continually talks of you etc.
Probably you have heard of the greatest money panic that this country has ever known is at its height or turning point. We do not known just exactly how it will turn till the election of a president and other Government Officials. As the Republicans have had control of the nations affairs so long they want it for an additional 4 Years. They have the dough. Other reason for the bringing on of these hard times is to starve out the laboring man as the "wages" will come down and bust up organized labor of this country. So far I have not read of any Union bursting in Texas

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but have read time and time again where banks and numerous merchants going to the wall. Seems like the moneyed men of this United States started too early, for they seem to realize the fact that we (the laboring class) control the votes of this country, so the harder they push us, the harder we push them. And again instead of the laboring class being hurt, the worse it has turned for them to the Business Houses & Merchants. They are holding on by a hair's breadth now or other words trembling in the balance. The H. & T. C. shops are now working 8 hours a day and 3 days a week, something that was never known in the Road's history. The carpenter's Union in this City have voted to the last man to stand pat and tide the great wave over, and most of the 500 men have left for smaller towns and works so as to help keep their solemn oath. Why for the last 3 weeks I have worked in a new town named South Houston 10 miles from here and come home every Saturday night on the train. They pay there $3 for 9 hrs work while the boys in Houston get $4 for 8 hours work. Pretty tough to tough it on the road such as sleeping in a barn and sometimes a tent with the cool wind blowing in the

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cracks and eating bum grub, but Uncle you do not know how much the American Union man will endure and how many hardships he will stand for the death blow to child and women labor in factories and sweat shops. Father is also a Union machinist. Wish to state that we are pretty well fixed and hope to stand this financial money flurry. Sis does not intend getting married. She is working as a Stenographer in one of the largest Dry Goods Houses in the City. The boy is stout & healthy with the features of Scotland stamped on his face, very bright and intelligent. Wish to state that I received your paper of the Young Man's Literature. Many thanks for the same. While Pa's home we are fixing up our home such

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painting, new fences and working in our vegetable garden which saves a many a dollar grocery stores bill. We have an abundance of fine grapes and fig trees. The garden is also a help to feeding the cows. Wish to state the good news that the Preachers, Deacons, Christian people of every Denomination and Churches are in a combined force and putting their shoulders to the wheel and what they are doing to the Wiskey and Liquor traffic is a shame. Country after country are going dry. Breweries are closing down and the buildings are being used as factories and warehouses. Let the good work continue. You can bank that Prohibition will win inside of two years. Pa corresponds regular with his niece Mrs Margaret Georgianna MacLeod.
Wish to inform you that the crops of the country are going to exceed those of last year by a large margin. No frost, good moisture, just the right kind of weathers at the right time. Things look like they are opening up a bit in the building line of this city. A new RailRoad building

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two depot and freight sheds/yards.
The company bought 10 blocks right in the residence district and it looked wrong for the city to grant a RR. the right to buy 10 city blocks and compel the people to sell or move their houses. Most of the houses were large two and a half story. They are all moved now and one large Jewish Church (brick) was torn down. The Government is going to build a $400,000 Post Office. The County is going to build a large 3 story brick Court House comprising a block. The Money Men are building a 5 story modern fire-proof Theatre. Two sisters of the Scanlin family are going to build a 12 story Office building on principal Main Street corner. A Newspaper is going to build a 12 story Office Bld. also in business district. These last two buildings held back for 6 or 10 months at least till the money starts going around more freely.

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Kindly excuse heavy writing it seems like my pennmanship is getting on the back list.
I went through the Eight Grade in school and have a pretty fair knowledge of Arithmetic so I have decided to work one year more as a Journeyman Carpenter then I'm going to become a Contractor. Can't get rich making from 31/2 to $4 a day. Will again ask you to excuse long and troublesome letter because I am a talking piece of furniture. Also being as I received your last letter of Aug 28.07, if my writing is tiresome to you just let me know and it will cease and no harm done. I am a pecular fellow, there is not a person in the world that I hate - do not know what that word means. Will close with best wishes for you and Yours. From your Unseen Effectionate Loving American Nephew
Louis A. Macdonald
835 Cortland St. - full address on envelope.

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June 6 1908

Dear Uncle Roderick,
It is with the most extreme sadness that I take in hand to deliver across the wide ocean the sad news of your loving and only brother Henry Ebenezer death. This is how it happened. Tuesday June 2 he went to a friends funeral got some whiskey and cream cheese. Ate that during the night and in the morning he was pretty sick, the whiskey as you know causes the cheese to cook. He had bought some Parish Green for to kill some bugs that got on the grapes. Early that morning he intended taking some Cream a Tarta and

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Sulphur but by mistake he got the Parish green and Cream a Tarta in the dark. He immediately vomited it up. The next two days he purged and vomited and drank ice water. Thursday evening June 4 at $ o'clock he realized of a sudden that he had made a mistake, he told mamma and immediately got a no. 1 physican. Got the ambulance, hurried him to a private Sanitarium, got another Dr., two trained nurses. We worked on him and give him the very finest of medicine or ancedotes to conflict with the one he took. We revived him to some extent, his feet ceased to show the blueness but at 15 minutes to 4 Friday evening June 5 he expired. Oh Uncle he did not want to die he fought to the last ????? ?????

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his mind till two or three minutes before he expired. I went with him in the ambulance and on the way he told me something to tell you but I just cannot remember. You see Uncle that I had every thing in charge am pretty nearly worn out.
This is Saturday and will mail this letter in the evening. The Machinists and Sharks Club will have charge of the burial with the exception of the best Baptist Minister in the city who will officiate. Glenwood Cemetery Sunday Eve at 3p.m. is the date and time set to put him in his last resting place. Oh he certainly suffered. He died an awfull painful death. Some of the Parish Green got through ????? ????? ?????.

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Mother says she is awful sorry that you never wrote your only brother. His mind was very weak these last remaining months so that he could not compose a letter. Wish to inform his relatives that he will receive a very elaborate funeral. Even if he was a drunkard. I have spared nothing got the best hearse in Houston, best Minister, a very good casket. etc. Probably I will write in a few days. If you want to know any thing else I will gladly furnish it to you.
Will close with Love to All
Very Respectfully
Your Effectionate Nephew
Louis A. Macdonald
835 Cortland St. Hou Heights Texas
Wrote to his niece in Scotland Mrs Mar. G. MacLeod.
Please write immediately Louis.

Newspaper cutting detailing the death of Henry E. MacDonald sent to his broth Roderick MacDonald in Melbourne, Australia.

H. E. MACDONALD TOOK PARIS GREEN
-----------------
Death Ensued After Four Days of Suffering
-----------------

           Lingering from 1 o'clock Tuesday morning until Friday afternoon, Henry E. Macdonald died from the effect of a dose of paris green taken by mistake. A few hours before he ceased to breathe he had been removed to the Houston infirmary.
           The poison was taken in the dark. Rising before dawn, the man reached for the cream of tartar, but secured the wrong dish. Mixing the death dealing powder with water, he swallowed the concoction. Almost immediately thereafter the effect of the slow but deadly poison was felt. Gradually he grew worse until Friday noon he was transferred to the hospital from his home, 835 Courtland Street, Houston heights.
           The victim of the poison had been for thirty-six years an employe in the shops of the Houston and Texas Central railroad, was a skilled mechanic and a member of the mechanics' union and the Sharks' club. At the time of his death Macdonald was 61 years of age. He is survived by his wife, a son, Mr. L. A. Macdonald, and a daughter, Mrs G. H. Broecker.
           Funeral services will be held Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock, Rev. R. D. Wilson officiating. Interment will be in the Glenwood ecemtery

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Mr Roderick MacDonald,
Melbourne, Australia

Houston Heights, Texas, July 1st-08

Dear Unce Roderick:--

I hope you will not think hard of me for not writing to you before but I could not write at the time brother Louis did for I was prostrated with grief and could not. I received such a 1oving and sympathetic letter from cousin Margaret yesterday and it was filled with such beautiful talk of papa about what she knew when he was a young man. I have just finished writing to her and will write you a few lines, but it takes all the courage I can command to write about dear father. There isn't words sufficient to express our grief. It was such a sudden shock that it has nearly killed mother and she is nearly prostrated with grief. Uncle Roderick, we did all we could do for father- all that doctors could do - all that nurses and nursing could do was done but it was of no avail. He passed away and Oh, how we miss him at home. He was alway so bright and happy and had a smile for every one. No matter how tired he was when he came home at night from work he always had a smile for us, and Oh, uncle, how I miss him.
I want to tell you uncle, that I believe what cousin Margaret wrote me was true. She said, "He may have been foolish at times, but he was a thorough christian in his youngdays and he could not forget the past."
He always talked of God and quoted passeges from the Bible, and, just before he lost consciousness his face lit up with a smile that covered his whole face, just, like the

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sun rising on a beautiful May morning. He lived just a little while and then was gone. While he was sick he always called for mamma and would not let her out of his sight. He did not leave a message to any one but you, and he re-gretted that you did not write to him. In my 1st letter to cousin Margaret, I wrote her to write to you and ask you to write to father for it seemed such a difficult task for him to write. He always said it hurt his head. I have seen him get his stationery and pen and ink and try to write but he would rub his head and say, "I can't get my mind together to write- I will have to wait until another time" and in that way he would put it off from time to time until I would feel sorry for him and wrote the few lines to you that I did.
Every letter that he received from you made him so happy and he would smile and read it and it seemed to please him beyond words.
Uncle Roderick, I feel that I cannot finish my letter until I tell you how he looked after he entered his last sleep. He was the most beautiful corpse you ever saw in your life. Such a fine looking man and you could not believe that he was dead. He looked so calm and peaceful just as if he had gone to sleep. He was so fond of the fresh air and al-ways slept on the porch where he could get the breeze. Uncle, it seemed if the wind knew that he was gone and that while alive he loved the breeze and fresh air, for the last two days that we had him with us it was such a beautiful breeze, the curls on his forehead fanned with the wind. We would not let him be put into the cascet until the day of the furneal. Wwe wanted to see him here himself, just like as if he was sleeping until the last minute because he did not look like he was dead. Oh, uncle, while I am writing to you, the tears are running down my cheeks and I can scarcely write. Mother says, "Every day I miss him more", also that she will never be able to get over his death.

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Uncle Roderick, I do not believe a man was ever loved among his shop mates as papa was. They all came to look at him and every one said "That just looks like Mac; we cannot believe that he is dead. He does not look like a man of 62 years. He looks as if he were only 45 or 50 years at the most." The head man of the shop thought so much of him and came to the house to see him. His Foreman, came also. He thought there was nothing like Mac. The Machines Union selected the pall bearers, and in some way the Foreman was omitted and he came to us and just begged us to let him be one of the pall bears. He not only came once but two or three times until we communicated with the Union and had one or the number selected omitted and let the Foreman take his place. All the men considered it a great honor to help carry him to his last resting place.
I tell you Uncle Roderick, a man with a bigger and kinder heart never lived. For every subscription that was raised for a good cause, he would contribute to it. He gave to the orphans, widows, sick ones, homeless, starving, needy, and to any one that was in need of help of any kind, no matter what creed, even if he would do without himself. He only had one fault, and we must forget that now, (although every one knew it and thought just as much of him). The world I know is better for him having lived in it.
The very night before he made that fateful mistake he sang that song, I think it is entitled "You can win a bonnie lassie when the kie came hame".
I am sending you the last photo of father. It is not a good one but it is the last. It is about ten years since he had one taken and it is the very first he had taken since he had his beard shaved off. He looked so different without his beard. The picture is one taken of the garden. If you remember the photo we sent you not long ago of the home with mother on the gallary, the garden is just to the left. Papa had a lot next to the home and he planted it in vegatables and grapes in the center. He made such a pretty arbor. That garden was the pride of his life. He would get up early in the morning before he would go to work and work in the garden. Just as soon as he would return from

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work he would eat his supper and go out in the garden and work until dark. Consequently, he had one of the finest gardens in Houston Heights. Every one would stop and admire it and talk to him about it if he was in it
Recently, a gentleman moved here from the northern part of the United States where it is cold the greater portion of the year and where vegetables do not grow like they do in Texas. The man is a real estate man and and is anxious to advertise Texas. He is interested in the gardens of the Heights and one day he came, or morning rather, he came to the house and said he wanted to take a photo of the garden as it was the finest garden he had seen at Houston Heights. Papa had been at work for some time in the garden. (He rose earlier than usual that morning on account of the shops laying the men off, on account of the dull times. They would just work a few days a week). It was six o'clock and the sun was just rising. Papa was just as delighted as a child and stood in the front of the garden holding a bunch of grapes. But that morning the man was not interested in taking papa's photo as he was to get a view of the garden, for he was to come in a few days and get a better view of papa but he failed to come and this is the only one we have of papa taken within the last ten years. He was in his working clothes and looks as natural as can be. Mamma says to tell you "That papa was taken in his vineyard, but now he is in the vineyard of the Lord."

I will now close for this time and trust to hear from you soon. With love and best wishes, I remain,
Your affectionate neice.,
me
Mrs G. Broecker
P.S. --
I am enclosing you a little stamp picture or myself. It has been a long time since you have had one from me. Papa thought there was no one like "Georgie" as he called me and thought the sun rose and set in me. He just idolised me and thought there was no one like me. G. B.

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Mr. Roderick MacDonald,
Melbourne, Australia.

Witchita Falls, Texas, Oct. 25, 1908.

My Dear Uncle : -

Your kind and loving letter of August l9th reached me about a week ago and it was indeed a great pleasure to receive it. It was forwarded to me from home for I am no longer 1iving at Houston Heights, Texas.
Since writing you last I have married and have moved to a little City about four hundred miles from Houston. I was aquainted with my husband before Father passed away, and after Father was gone it did not seem. like home any longer to me, and so I decided to try and have a home of my own. Neither one of us have what the world call financial possessions at present, but he is a man who aappreciates a wife and can make a comfortable living for her. He is what one could call a good sensible man and a man of sense. We are both good christians and are living very happy and contented together. I arn going to send you our photos sometime in the near future.
This is a beautiful little City of 8,000 inhabitants and is one of the heealthiest Cities in the State. I have gained much in health since I am 1iving here in this City. I was very thin and weighed but little but now have gained considerable in weight. My husband and I do not know how long we will live at this place for I want to live in Houston where the rest of the home folks are, but Mr. Newlen is thinking of going into business in a short time and if he does, we will remain here for some time, but in the near future we intend to return to Houston. I think this City is one of the most beautiful in Texas but my little boy George does not 1ike it and would not remain with me but has returned to his Grandmother in Houston Heights, where he is attending school and that is one reason that I am so anxious to return. You can address your letters to me at this place and in the event I should return to Houston, I will have my mail forwarded to me.
Your letter gave me so much pleasure to know that you appreciated it and I felt that you would for I have an idea what kind of letters brother Louis wrote you prior to Father's death and that is the reason I wrote you 1ike I did. Dear old "Daddy" had his fault but every one liked him and esteemed him. Often did brother make his heart ache when he (brother) told Father what he was going to write and tell you about him. Father would say to him,"Louis, my brother has known me longer than you have and knows I would do nothing to disgrace the family name", and he also told brother that he was just begining to live and that he (Father) was near the end of life's journey.
It is one of the greatest comforts that I have in knowing that I did what I could to make Father's life as pleasant and as happy as possible while he lived. Your earnest and heartfelt sympathy is greatly appreciated for I miss him so much for I

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was his favorite child. Yes, I know that mother misses Father for his death has been a hard blow to her but it makes us re-member that it is a link between us and the life beyond, and it is a great pleasure to me to think of meeting Father on the other shore.
We are having very pleasant weather at the present time. It is autumn with us and great preparations are in progress for the harvest, and cotton especially.

What a b1essing it must be to you and Aunt Annie to have such a large familly and that you have three married, happy and with a little child in each home to bless father and mother.
It is a pleasure to me to know that you are pleased with the photo of Father in the garden and I must say it is a lovely garden. And I'll tell you why it is a pleasure to me to know that you are so pleased with the photo of the garden. I ordered and had those photos taken myself for brother Louis would not have anything to do with them. But I knew that you would ap-preciate them and so I had them taken and sent it to you as soon as possible.
I will now close. With love to you dear Uncle, and asking to be remembered to rest of the family, I am,
Your loving niece,
Georgianna Newlen.

P.S.
Please wrote soon for it is a great pleasure to me to hear from you.
G.N.